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I just extracted my first ever harvest. I put the wet frames back into the supers and then set them outside for the bees to clean and dry them. I then put the frames in the freezer but not the super boxes. Should I leave the frames in the freezer or take them out and store them? If I should take them out, should they thaw before storing in plastic bag or tote? Also, does the super box need anything special done to it, or can I just stack them up in my garage? Thanks for any input.
 

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Hello bluegrass, you can put the whole frame of honey in the freezer if you want to store them. The wet frames can be put back in the supers then placed over the inner cover of a hive, with outer cover on top; the bees will move up through the center inner cover hole to clean every spot of honey off those frames. No need to freeze boxes unless you have specific diseases like n. cerana. You could leave extracted frames in freezer if you want. Thaw before putting in plastic bags for storage. You can stack them in your garage but make sure there are no holes for mice and other critters to get in. Keep an eye out for wax moth too.
 

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Thanks, I had already extracted the honey, and let the bees clean the frames. I have them in the freezer now, but wasn't sure what to do next. If I thaw them out, would that allow infestation of wax moths?
 

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Wax moths can infest whenever they can, even after you thaw out your frames. It depends on how you store your frames.
 

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Thanks, I had already extracted the honey, and let the bees clean the frames. I have them in the freezer now, but wasn't sure what to do next. If I thaw them out, would that allow infestation of wax moths?
Just read this in another response: used to worry about getting supers 'cleaned' before winter, but no more. We stack em up in storage as wet frames, then they go on the following season over the excluder still smelling like wet honey. Takes about 5 minutes for the bees to move up when we do it that way. Another huge benefit to having wet frames in storage, wax moths will avoid frames still wet with honey. If they dont, they get stuck in the honey and fail to reproduce.

I didn’t know that! Learn something new everyday.
 

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....... wax moths will avoid frames still wet with honey.....
I have this [email protected] residue.
Where the bees dried it - the moths get right into it.
Where the residue is still sticky with honey - no moths.
It has to be pretty sticky though, there is some point beyond which the moths start getting in.

And so - just keep the frames wet (keeping the bees away is much easier than the moths) and don't worry of this entire thing.
The idea of "drying the frames" yet again boils down to the human attempt to tiding thing up.
The bees just as well will use the last year's wet frames.
 

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I like the idea of storing them wet. What process is best for that? Do you still freeze them first? Put them in plastic bags or totes? I assume it needs to be air tight. Would the wet frames mold? Thanks for the advice
 

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Just take them; put into tight containers/bags and put away.
No need to freeze - honey-full frames hardly ever have moths (the same right after the extraction).
The containers need to be moth-tight and bee-tight, not air tight.
They will not mold; the ripe honey is a very dry product (unless you store them in very humid place - then the honey will take in water).
A little mold (if any is a non-concern and is for bees to clean up).
 
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