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I lost a hive this winter as did many this year. Brutal winter for many , including lots of animals. Ended up with 8 full frames of honey in the lost hive. The plan is putting these in my freezer wrapped in a plastic trash bag. Anybody see a problem doing this ? Not sure what I'm gonna do with them. Either extract them later on but I wonder about the taste,or feed them back in the spring. Any thoughts ?

Thanks,
Mike
 

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Just make sure to thaw out the frames before you put bees on them.
 

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Just make sure to thaw out the frames before you put bees on them.
I agree, it should work fine...As a matter of fact, I have some in the freezer also...

Concerning the point above, Any idea how long it takes for a frame to defrost...or how long one should wait before putting bees on it?
 

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I defrost still sealed in the bag (and when the humidity isn't too high) so they don't pick up an enormous amount of moisture. I think 2 days at 70 degrees did it.
 

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I simply pulled them out of the freezer and put them in the hives the morning of the day before my packages arrived. They did get condensation on them, but it was not a big deal. I also made sure to hive the packages in the mid to late afternoon so the frames were the warmest they could be without heating them. I suppose you could leave them in a heated area if you wanted, I just did not think it was worth it and the bees did not seem to mind the 50-60 degree frames ( outside air temp).
 

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Either extract them later on but I wonder about the taste,or feed them back in the spring. Any thoughts ?

Thanks,
Mike
If he decides to freeze the honey frames and extract them the later, there are no quality, properties, degrading, etc. of the honey? If this is the case why don't we refrigerate honey in jars? Which makes me also wonder how does freezing first then extracting effect how/when/if the honey crystalizes in jars?:scratch:
 

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By far, real far, the best way to preserve the taste of honey is to leave it in the comb capped and freeze it. I still have about 4 chunks of comb honey in the freezer from 12 years ago. I took one out just last week and the flavor is awesome. By now it has granulated some, but I don't care. I'm thinking, forget the extractor, I'll just go cut comb from now on.
 

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By far, real far, the best way to preserve the taste of honey is to leave it in the comb capped and freeze it. I still have about 4 chunks of comb honey in the freezer from 12 years ago. I took one out just last week and the flavor is awesome. By now it has granulated some, but I don't care. I'm thinking, forget the extractor, I'll just go cut comb from now on.
Richard Taylor would be proud!
 

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If he decides to freeze the honey frames and extract them the later, there are no quality, properties, degrading, etc. of the honey? If this is the case why don't we refrigerate honey in jars? Which makes me also wonder how does freezing first then extracting effect how/when/if the honey crystalizes in jars?:scratch:
>>>there are no quality, properties, degrading, etc. of the honey?

That's my understanding

>>If this is the case why don't we refrigerate honey in jars?

Because, refrigeration is at a temperature that will promote crystallization, whereas freezing will either slow it, or not effect it. At least, that's my understanding..."You can freeze honey, but should never refrigerate it" is what I've always read and heard.

>>>Which makes me also wonder how does freezing first then extracting effect how/when/if the honey crystallizes in jars?

I would guess that the freezing slows the crystallization process....with "guess" being the operative word. :D
 

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If the honey is capped, then the only reason to freeze it, is to kill off any wax moth eggs or other insect eggs in the combs. If left in the hive, even with bees still in there, during the coldest part of the winter, frames at the edges will freeze solid, and during the warm parts of the summer, it'll be exposed to 90+ degree temps. The capped honey will store just fine in a hive thru those temperature extremes, so it'll last just as well in the closet if it's capped. Freezing and bagging is about pest control, not about honey storage.
 
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