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Hi everyone Maryland checking in,

It's been a while, I have deep frames of last years capped (mostly) honey that has some fresh nectar in them as well from this year.

I want to freeze it and save it for a swarm, nuc from a demarre or to feed back this fall for fall made nucs from my queen raising project. I am not leaving them on a colony for storage because I dont want the bees having to cross yet more territory to the supers, ya I know about upper entrances but I dont want to tear a colony down if I need them for another use, during a flow.

My question is, can I just leave them in the freezer? Or will extended exposure to below freezing dry the honey too much that the bees will have a hard time retireving it? Will it still extract if frozen for 6 months? This would be a good indicator of how well the bees will like it, to me anyways.

Rarely do I have wax moth or shb, I usually freeze everything for 3 days before putting it up for storage, brood and super frames, I leave it wet before the freeze, so far so good and the bees move right up into it in the spring.

I have kept my colonies totally chem and treatment free for the last 4 years and dont want to use any on the frames/comb at this point in the game.

Thank You for any of your "freezer" experiences.
 

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I don't think leaving it in the freezer will hurt anything. But if you don't want to leave it in there for that long I have a chemical free storage suggestion.

Wrap it in plastic wrap just before you completely seal it up drop a small block of dry ice inside, the seal it up with the plastic wrap.

You can get a really big roll of the wrap at lowes, home depot or the U-haul store. Dry ice is just carbon dioxide and you can usually find it in most walmart stores for about $2.00.

I did that with 6 deeps that had various amounts of honey and pollen and a bunch of supers too. It worked great because the dry ice creates an oxygen deprived environment where critters can't live.

Alex
 

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When we pull honey in Florida we ship it to Michigan to be extracted in a reefer trailer. It spends about 24 hours at 0 degrees. The reason we do it is to kill the beetles. The only problem we have is keeping it from getting too dry when its being warmed back up. We also freeze all of our dead brood boxes this way before they're re-used to kill any wax moths and beetles.
 

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Freezing honey in jars for a year or more doesn't seem to hurt is at all. In fact is seems to be the best way to store honey to keep the color/flavor as it was at extracting.

A couple of years ago I had one frame left after doing my extracting in July or August. I just walked over an put it in the freezer. The next May I put it back on the bees. I never noticed any difference in that frame during the next extraction.
 
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