Beesource Beekeeping Forums banner

1 - 18 of 18 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
42 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Need help. I have trouble taking out frames out of the hive. Everytime I take it out to check it I can't put it back in there cause it's so wide. I end up trimming it before I put it in there. And everytime I do it it's such a mess, I end up squezzing bees, damaging combs. What would you suggest. Should I move to 9 frames instead of 10?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,144 Posts
First thing you want to do is find the problem, are you making sure that the #1 frame and the #10 frame is away from the side walls and all the frames (1-10) are "tight" up against one another?????? If they are not then thats when you will experience the problem you are having. Clean it up and fix them nice and tight and you should be good to go! i also had this problem with Duragilt foundation, the bees were double combing one side, after asking around i found out several ppl was having the same problem and they to was using Duragilt foundation...After cleaning it up twice needlless to say i left the bees make their home the way they wanted to. That hive today is strong as ever so the ladies must of done something right cause it sure wasnt the beekeeper...hahaha Good Luck!!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
34,542 Posts
Let me get this straight. The frames were in the hive before you removed them and when you went to put them back in they were too wide? You must not have moved the frames over tightly as you replaced them.

Is your equipment home made or from a supply company? Maybe it is too tight to begin w/?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,025 Posts
Pushing the frames together is the best solution. The girls will keep building the frames out if you go to 9, then 8, then 7, etc. Sure they will stop ceell depth at some point but you will discover the novel ways bees use "bee space".
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
220 Posts
I don't know if this is the right way to do it but when I work a hive I first use my hive tool and push all the frames to one side and that gives me a gap to work with. Then I take the first 1 or 2 frames out and go through the hive. As I inspect and put each of the remaining 8 frames back, I return them to the near wall and then make sure each is against the next. Then I shove them back across the hive to the far wall and put in the last 2. Then I center the frames leaving the extra space on the sides equal. Always keeping them tight to one another so I don't loose the space to take them out.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,016 Posts
Last year I had a chamber that was a mess with wide comb. I gave up and just pushed everything together. The bees cut it down and took care of it all.

The solution is to be sure to scrape the propolis and junk that builds up on the ears. When there is to much it will make the frames stand off each other a little (but 10x a little adds up). This will allow you to keep the frames tight.

Mike
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
34,542 Posts
I don't know if this is the right way to do it but when I work a hive ... Then I center the frames leaving the extra space on the sides equal. Always keeping them tight to one another so I don't loose the space to take them out.
Sounds good to me. And I guess it works for you, so it is the right way.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
42 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
I'm afraid if I'll push them in too tight I'll squeeze the queen. My problem is that I moved from top bar hive to longstraght hive and combs on TBH are way wider. I couldn't squeeze them together from day one.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
507 Posts
I agree with keeping the frames tight when replacing them in the hive. I've run into two problems when pushing the frames back together again, 1) the girls get in the way and 2) propolis, etc.

Use your hive tool and scrap everything off of the end pieces and keep them nice and tight when you put them back in the hive.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
274 Posts
I think the key here is that you are using combs that started out in your TBH. You need to gradually substitute frames designed for the hive you are using now. If you want to continue foundationless, Kellys has nice ones.
Best Wishes
Meridith
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,261 Posts
My problem is that I moved from top bar hive to longstraght hive and combs on TBH are way wider. I couldn't squeeze them together from day one.
ahh, the root of the problem. I know nothing of TBH's or Longstraights maybe one of the TBH guys could chime in and help you,, sounds like your switch of method and equipment has created a mess.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
34,542 Posts
I'm afraid if I'll push them in too tight I'll squeeze the queen. My problem is that I moved from top bar hive to longstraght hive and combs on TBH are way wider. I couldn't squeeze them together from day one.
Then there was no need to have ten frames in the box.

Do these combs have frames around them now?

Also, you Thread title is misleading. It should have been "Combs that are too wide." But we still would have assumed that it was the frames that you were refering to. So you just can't win.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
2,668 Posts
Folks, I didn't see anything that suggested the original poster transferred combs from a TBH to a Langstroth.

You manage Langstroth hive and TBH differently.

I trim the frames in my broodnest down to 1 1/4 inch wide. This keeps the combs a uniform width. It also gives me more room in the box to work if I only run 10 combs.

Quit worrying about squishing the queen when you squeeze frames together tightly. She fit in between frames before you took them out. If you know the frame the queen is on, slide it gently against the next frame. Then use your hive tool to squeeze all the frames tightly. The queen will be fine.

If your comb widths are uneven, worry more about rolling or pinching the queen when you remove a frame.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
34,542 Posts
CB, read the last post that the author of the op has written. i don't think that there are any frames. Only comb.

I know. Kids do the strangest things. :) Sorry ivashka.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,144 Posts
Not knowing all the information no one is gonna beable to answer the question. What i do know is that from all the "NEW information that wasnt stated at the beginning is true then the "Removable Swarm Catching Frames would of been my top choice of frame for this particular change over from the TBH to a lang and like i said from the beginning that hasnt changed is keep the frames tight. Here is a link if you need any further assistance on the building plans of a swarm catching frame since its your best bet in your situation that i "assume" that your in from the info that i have read so far! Good Luck!!!
http://www.beesource.com/files/swarmfrm1.pdf
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
2,668 Posts
CB, read the last post that the author of the op has written.

I did. It sounds to me like ivashka began beekeeping with a TBH, and is now trying to learn how to manage a Langstroth. If they are running a Langstroth hive, it's going to have frames.

Sometimes bees will make one frame really fat at the top, and the next frame narrow. The frames have to go back in the box in the same order or else you would need to trim down the high spots and might crush bees.

Their user name sounds Russian, so I suspect some of the issue may be in imperfect English. More clarity would help though.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,183 Posts
Since I do mostly foundationless I have the same issue sometimes, but it isn't all that hard to deal with. One thing you can do is put a dummy frame against one side, then you can pull it out without hurting anything and create room to manipulate the other frames - when you put it back you slide it down the wall and it will push any bees out of the way as you replace it. Then some time when those wide combs are empty trim them and straighten them out. I have some that started out really crooked and mis-shaped that are now straight as can be. Or you can just harvest them as cut comb or crush and strain honey and try to do better next time.
 
1 - 18 of 18 Posts
Top