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I would like to know your thoughts on what can and can't be done with framed of honey with bee popped on the top bars from dead outs.

First year keeper in Northern Michigan (Tawas City). Today was the first day since late October that the bees could go out on a cleansing flight. 3 hives were dead outs. Pretty sure that I didn't provide enough ventilation (lots of water in the empty cells). In the 3 dead outs there was a lot of poop on the top bars. (I can take photos if interested or if it will help.)

Do I clean them?
Do I place them on top of the 2 hives that are still kicking?
Can you remove the honey for human consumption?

Thanks in advance,
Rodney
 

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I would scrape the feces off the top bar. If the bees died a bit ago, there is nothing like nosema still viable in it so it poses no threat to your bees and you can do anything you want with it really. If you want to eat it and it doesn't bother you, it won't hurt you. I personally would not want to sell it because someone would find out and be aghast. Put those full frames of honey in boxes on the bottom board and put a queen excluder over them. The bees will move the honey up and even into a super placed above the brood nest where you could sell it as a pristine product. Someone is going to scream foulbrood so look for any brood cells with perforated caps and sticky decomposing larvae. If you find those, send a sample off to Beltsville MD to see if you have foulbrood. If you do, the honey cannot be fed back to any bees. If you personally have no larval stage in your life cycle, you can eat it or make mead with it.
 

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I beg to differ on that point. as the spores of Nosema apis can live a dormant state an awful long time.
Nosema apis is a microsporidian, a small, unicellular parasite recently reclassified as a fungus that mainly affects honey bees. It causes nosemosis, also called nosema, which is the most common and widespread of adult honey bee diseases.[1] The dormant stage of N. apis is a long-lived spore which is resistant to temperature extremes and dehydration, and cannot be killed by freezing the contaminated comb. Nosemosis is a listed disease with the Office International des Epizooties
The spores can live on or in the comb until ingested by a bee, at which time the cycle of the microsporidian is completed the growing fungus within the gut matures producing spores that are evacuated within the feces of the host to begin the cycle over.
Examination of the feces under microscope would reveal the spores. however it could also be dysentery.
 
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