Beesource Beekeeping Forums banner

1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
35 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hey all,

My plan is to harvest without an extractor. I have seen several videos online of how people do this by cutting the honeycomb out of the frame and squishing/straining. However, I don't know what these kind of frames are called? They have no plastic or wire..Basically they are just empty. Is there a particular name for these type of frames? I am sure that my new beekeeping books I ordered will have the answer, but in the meantime I thought I might ask here so I can do some research and price out a kit. Thanks:)
 

·
Vendor
Local feral survivors in eight frame medium boxes.
Joined
·
54,120 Posts
Typically people doing crush and strain use mediums or shallows with thin surplus or suplus foundation (comb honey). This is typically used without wires. Another variation is you break out the wedge and turn it sideways and nail it back in and use no foundation. Another is to buy foundationless frames from Walter T. Kelley.

http://www.bushfarms.com/beesfoundationless.htm

Some people use plastic and just use a spatula to scrape the comb off the plastic. I've never tried it.

http://www.bushfarms.com/beesharvest.htm
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
35 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Yes.. My wife and I, at this point in our young beekeeping careers, are perfectly happy to use the crush and strain method. We plan on being small-time hobbyists only keeping enough bees for honey for us and our friends/family.. So I cant see spending a lot of money on an extractor.

thanks for the tips!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
494 Posts
Having done both wax and plastic for crush and strain, the plastic spatula on plastic foundation is a lot easier than cutting out the wax.

After you're done just put the frames back on the hive and you'd be amazed at how fast they build it back up w/ a little honey and residual wax left over.


(Here's my girls harvesting product from my other girls: http://www.combshouse.com/~bob/pics/bees/justPics/scrapingHoney.jpg)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,300 Posts
One more reason to make connections with other local beekeepers: consider borrowing an extractor. Sometimes you trade some honey for the privilege, or you make some other kind of barter arrangement.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
76 Posts
I have found that you can carefully scrape the comb off the foundation and it will be reusable. This works with wax as well as plastic. After a couple years doing this you may opt to try and salvage the combs by trading off and using others spinner or with luck my find a small inexpensive used one. Having combs saves the bees a lot of work.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
494 Posts
Having combs saves the bees a lot of work.
I'm not all that convinced it does save them all that much work. During a big flow they build out comb pretty darned fast. (That old adage of 7lbs honey to 1lb wax isn't backed by any data or science. Someone put it in print back in the 1800s and it's been repeated ever since.)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
35 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I am thinking of going foundationless because I heard that if you use plastic foundation and scrape them off, that the bees have problems rebuilding the comb.. If I were to go with plastic foundations instead of foundationless, how much honey and comb should you leave on the plastic for the bees to work it again?

Thanks guys!
Chris:)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
152 Posts
If you go with plastic foundation, and scrape it clean, you can brush on some melted beeswax to get them to draw it back out.

I've never used plastic foundation, or gone foundationless (I'm still a relatively new beek... but I've got wired frames and use an extractor), but it seems like foundationless might be an easier solution... cut out all the comb, then wax the top of the frame to encourage them to draw it again in the spring... instead of scrapping all the wax off the plastic, then re-coating it with wax..
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
76 Posts
I have only scraped the comb off wax foundation. They will go back to it no problem. It sounds to me like you will be best off with the foundationless and just crush and strain less you like the honey raw or from the comb.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,368 Posts
You can scrape the plastic as much as you like, there's always a little smear of wax and honey left. They draw that very well as long as there is a flow/feeder on. It's the new plastic that can be trickier.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
98 Posts
Yes.. My wife and I, at this point in our young beekeeping careers, are perfectly happy to use the crush and strain method. We plan on being small-time hobbyists only keeping enough bees for honey for us and our friends/family.. So I cant see spending a lot of money on an extractor.

thanks for the tips!
Same here.. I only have one hive and probably won't get more than 2. One thing I've found is the place where I got my bees from has an "extraction day" where you can bring in your frames and use their really nice extractors. Not sure how much or if it costs anything, but no muss, no fuss...
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Top