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Someone please help an old man. I was taught that when you take a brood frame or a honey super frame to exaime, you must place it back in the same direction that it was originally facing. a local beek told me to today that it does not matter. What I mean, if the end bar of the frame was facing South, then that same end bar should be put back facing South, not truning the frame 180 degrees. I know that you can change placement of a frame in a hive but does the direction of the frame matter?,
 

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I've only been doing this for 3-1/2 years now, but I've learned from some of the best beeks in our area, and what you had recommended to you is true. It's best to put them back in the way you took them out. It's less disruptive to the hive. But it's not a disaster if you don't. I've had to reverse frames because sometimes they are reluctant to fill the outer side with honey. So I'll reverse them so the empty side is towards the middle. They usually fill them out then. I've also moved frames with brood down in the fall, so they will work their way up through the food supply as the winter progresses. I usually get them scrambled and reversed doing that, with little noticeable ill effects.
 

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Keeping it the same is more or less the right way, the frames are really not drawn perfectly the same depth on either side, so when you turn them 180 degree, you could be squashing bees, this is my main concern, putting in the same matches the comb either side, sometimes when they draw new frames uneven, then I crape the high side and perhaps turn 180 degree.

Konrad
 

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search "housel positioning" on this site. Basically in theory what you have been told is true. We utilize this theory and mark all our frames accordingly (as foundation) so that we put things back the way it was when we removed it. MAKE A DIFFERENCE? I dont know but I think happy bees are productive bees so we follow this prinicple and are productive. Good luck
 

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I will "flip" the outside frame to put capped honey to the wood but thee rest I generaly put back the same direction.
 

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any disruption/confusion slows them down while they come to an agreement as to what to do. (picture bees scratching heads) :) how much depends on race of bees,strength of hive ,time of year,condition of flow etc...thats why some think its very important, and some think its no big deal-based on THEIR experiences. as someone who has made every boo-boo you can name (several times!!) i can only assure you the bees will live through it. good luck,mike
 

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Honey super frames too? So are you supposed to mark and number the frames in your honey super so you can replace them in the exact same spot after extraction?

What happens if you pull a couple frames of brood to make a split or to boost another hive....do you mark your frames to make sure they go in the new box the exact same way?

When working in a hive, I try to put frames back in like they came out, but I don't lose any sleep if one gets turned around.
 

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When nights are still cold (below 60F), I make every effort to keep the frames in their same order and orientation (with the exception that I often place combs of honey immediately adjacent to the outer combs covered with bees). But once the nighttime temperatures are 60F or above I will keep feeding empty combs into the brood area, this does seem to have the effect of increasing the brood nest size. Sometimes a queen will create a scattered brood nest, with disjunct combs of brood spread through the upper and lower brood supers. When this happens I like to consolidate the brood in the bottom super and place empty comb between frames of sealed brood and place combs of honey/pollen alternating with empty comb in the super above.
 
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