Beesource Beekeeping Forums banner
1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,291 Posts
i've wondered the same. That area always has propolis on frame frame rest. I wonder if it allows bees to propolis to hold frames more secure
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,280 Posts
the straight style is easier to make. the tapered style contacts the box less so it does not get glued in by the bees as much, the tapered ones come loose easier. when new the tapered ones tend to self center, the flat ones stay flat on top. the tapered ones are stronger where they tend to break... it is your choice.... I don't much care, I seem to have bigger problems.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
208 Posts
the straight style is easier to make. the tapered style contacts the box less so it does not get glued in by the bees as much, the tapered ones come loose easier. when new the tapered ones tend to self center, the flat ones stay flat on top. the tapered ones are stronger where they tend to break... it is your choice.... I don't much care, I seem to have bigger problems.
I love trying to build my own too even if not much cheapier it's more satisfying... With help from this forum I have built 2 complete new hives with tops and bottom boards, 6 shallow honey supers, 4 5- frame nucs and 9 swarm traps.... The only thing I have had to buy are the frames...

Question if you don't put the guides in the frames will they not build out correctly or do you do it more for strength?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
208 Posts
The 2 dowel looking guides inside your frame... Is that for strength???

I know the thin line of foundation is to help the bees start....
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
11,246 Posts
Those who use dowels with foundationless frames typically do so because the bees may not attach the comb to all 4 sides of the frame (at least initially). The dowels provide additional strength to the unsupported bottom edge of the comb.

If you are used to pivoting frames (with foundation) parallel to the top bar to inspect the frame upside down, then that comb may be at risk of breaking without reinforcement. If you learn to rotate new foundationless comb end-for-end, the risk of breakage is lower.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
208 Posts
Those who use dowels with foundationless frames typically do so because the bees may not attach the comb to all 4 sides of the frame (at least initially). The dowels provide additional strength to the unsupported bottom edge of the comb.

If you are used to pivoting frames (with foundation) parallel to the top bar to inspect the frame upside down, then that comb may be at risk of breaking without reinforcement. If you learn to rotate new foundationless comb end-for-end, the risk of breakage is lower.
That's what I thought and makes total sense.... I added two foundationless frames to each honey super so I could have cut comb this year but I didn't reinforce and they built and filled with no issues....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
208 Posts
i used http://www.beesource.com/forums/showthread.php?277747-How-To-Make-Your-Own-Frames-Photo-Tutorial

Making tapered bars isn't that much different than making them straight. especially if you have a 2x10 or 2x12 where you are slicing a bunch at once.

i didn't put any sticks in mine.. just popsicle stick guides. just have to be smart until all sides are attached.
Instead of making all the joint cuts for the top bar to attach to the side couldn't you just attach flush with nails and then run a dowel through the top into the sides for strength? I have router and table saw but that is a lot of cuts and I like simplicity but it has to work too...
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
13,203 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I think it would be adequate but not as strong as the typical locking joint. I would use two smaller dowels and two crown staples at 90 degrees where one leg goes into the top bar and one into the end bar.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
208 Posts
I think it would be adequate but not as strong as the typical locking joint. I would use two smaller dowels and two crown staples at 90 degrees where one leg goes into the top bar and one into the end bar.
That is what I was thinking too because it would be easier and faster to make... I like the idea of the 90 degree staples for extra strength... I will give it a shot.... Plus if I copy the dowels inside the frame like your design that is even stronger correct???
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
652 Posts
Instead of making all the joint cuts for the top bar to attach to the side couldn't you just attach flush with nails and then run a dowel through the top into the sides for strength? I have router and table saw but that is a lot of cuts and I like simplicity but it has to work too...
it is a bunch of cuts but it can be done pretty efficiently if you do things in order and don't miss any pieces and have to reset. on my 2nd set of frames we used all table saw and no router. for some of the cuts we could set up a pile of pieces to run through at once.

watch out for launched pieces getting kicked back. we were setting field goal records in my dad's shop with a few top bar pieces haha

mine before gluing in comb guides
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
721 Posts
I use bamboo skewers from the dollar store for dowel rods. Cross wired with mono for support on deeps. Tongue depressors for starter guide in Kelly grooved top bar, side bar, and bottom bar. It was what I had to work with when I started, they drew it out fine.
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Top