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I have looked at the plans for a jig on this site and am confused on why they use non standard widths on spacers. I am a very novice woodworker and want to put together my own frames with a jig that is effective but easy to make. Any other suggestions?

Also, anyone have experience with Western Bee Supply and their unassembled frames? Feedback please.

Thanks for all the great posts, I get tons of helpful info here.

Soapy
 

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Western Bee Supply = Dadant.

Dadant gets all there wood ware from Western Bee Supply I think they own them.
 

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I looked at the .pdf file on the Beesource frame nailing jig and it looks OK to me, same as they have been made for decades. Mine has foam rubber on the inside of the folding door to more firmly push on the sidebars.
 

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Western Bee frames are good frames, But make sure that you end up getting all the right pieces. Before you have to have them, they made my order right with no problem but there was a mix up in parts. I will use them again.
 

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good video.

One should add the extra step,though,of using a small glue brush to spread the glue up the sides of the cutout.

The strongest glue bond is side grain and not end grain.
 

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I had a jig for a couple of years but quit useing it last year and now just do them one at a time. I think its faster. I use a jar of glue w/ small brush, a frameing square and a air stapler. I lay the top bar bottom up on the bench. Hold 2 end bars together and brush glue on both ends. Push them both down in place with the top bar. hold the square on the inside and shoot the angled staple through the side of the end bar. I then put the bottom bar in place and each end gets a staple. I flip the whole thing over and shoot a staple through the top bar into the top on the end. The whole process takes about 30 seconds. I can make up a box of 100 in a 1.5 hours
 

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quit useing it last year and now just do them one at a time. I think its faster.
:s

I highly disagree. A proper jig(spring loaded sides) will hold 10 frames at a time square. Over 100 per hr with air stapler including applying glue.
 

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I just built Ross's jig two days ago. I can knock out 10 frames a lot faster in the jig than singly - and I use an air stapler.
 

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:s

I highly disagree. A proper jig(spring loaded sides) will hold 10 frames at a time square. Over 100 per hr with air stapler including applying glue.
Theres no right or wrong here. My jig worked good to but in the time it takes to load 10, glue, staple, flip, glue again and staple I just found I could be quicker one at a time.
 

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I do mine one at a time too and I have a jig to do one at a time and I use 1/4"x 3/4" crown staples and NO glue. I am not trying to set any speed records so I agree with danno on loading 10 at a time.
 

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I made the Ross jig over the weekend, the results are impressive. The time to assemble ten frames is less than ten minutes, and I glue and staple. I plan on doing a time study to see exactly how much time is required on a normal basis. I can find someone locally willing to work out of their home and assemble my frames and a reasonable cost.
This could also be enlarged to work 20 frames at a time. Overall, I would rate this frame jig very high.
 
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