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I have decided that my eyesight and manual dexterity will not improve from here on in, so I have decided to cell punch for now. Rather than shoot holes in perfectly good wax foundation, I have decided that I will go foundationless on my deep frames, and tack in a plastic starter strip.
Are there any suggestions on how wide the starter strip should be, or are there any other ideas out there that might work better?
 

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Just cut 2 inch strips and tack in place. You can center and do half the length or across the whole frame. Either works just fine. What kind of frames are you using
 

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One good frame leads to another. Once you get a good straight frame started with a starter strip, or a sheet of foundation, the rest will follow. All of my frames are foundationlees, and now I just put in a frame, without anything, and the bees build it fine, as long as there is a straight comb on the next frame over.
 

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That's what I use too, but I paint wax on the wedge. Works good.
Billboard, I have read in some places that it is better to let the bees attach the wax to the wedge because it is a stronger bond. Since you said that the wax on the wedge works good I assume you have not had a problem. Have you tired both ways (wax and no wax on the wedge)?
 

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I have decided that my eyesight and manual dexterity will not improve from here on in, so I have decided to cell punch for now. Rather than shoot holes in perfectly good wax foundation, I have decided that I will go foundationless on my deep frames, and tack in a plastic starter strip.
Are there any suggestions on how wide the starter strip should be, or are there any other ideas out there that might work better?
I have been foundationless from the beginning of my beekeeping "experience" and all I did was snap off the starter strip on each frame and tack it back on flat, no strip of foundation at all. The drawn out comb was straight and perfect, perhaps I was just lucky?
 

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>Billboard, I have read in some places that it is better to let the bees attach the wax to the wedge because it is a stronger bond

I used to paint wax on the wedge but on a hot day sometimes it fell off... and bees following that lead can make a mess, plus heavy comb and a hot day can combine to cause a comb to fall...
 

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Thanks Michael. I thought I had read somewhere that it was better according to some to let the bees attach the comb directly to the bar because it was a stronger bond.
 

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Billboard, I have read in some places that it is better to let the bees attach the wax to the wedge because it is a stronger bond. Since you said that the wax on the wedge works good I assume you have not had a problem. Have you tired both ways (wax and no wax on the wedge)?
I just paint a very thin line of wax on the wedge to show them where. Never had it fall off or any other problems. but yes I started with frames from man lake and used starter strips. Both work good no problems.
 

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I will be trying some foundationless frames this year and got a package of 100 these to try. They snap in tightly into a grooved frame and may work. If you are interested, I would send you a half dozen to try for your opinion. Just give me your address.
 

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I've had good luck using cotton string soaked in beeswax & stapled onto top bars. I'm also testing wooden skewers pressure fit into deep frames for support.
 
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