Beesource Beekeeping Forums banner
1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
41 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ok so here is a little history. There have been beehives at my home yard for three years. This year I had two bear attacks so I moved the hives to several of my outyards that were fenced. I had a drum of syrup in my truck that had a small leak in the valve and I noticed when I brought my truck home bees would be waiting. I no longer have bees at my home so I was wondering where they might be coming from. I do have some hives about a mile away. But the majority are over 7 miles away. However when I watched the bees leave the drum they would not fly in that direction of the closest outyard. I decided I would beeline for these guys to see if I could find them. Well my third attempt today was successful. I found the hive! About 25 feet up in an old white oak tree. What a cool site!

Now the questions.
1) Do I observe them and see if they survive the winter?
2) Do I trap them out and capture potential survivor genetics. ( no idea how long they have been there). Could be a cast swarm from this year.
3) Do I set up swarm traps in the vicinity? ( most likely won't cast swarm this year)

Either way it was a lot of fun to find and even better to see them living in a tree.
So what would you do?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,646 Posts
>Do I trap them out and capture potential survivor genetics.
No I would leave them.


Set traps in all directions different distances. And also set some just as Beeman said.

A good year can get you 3 swarms from that tree.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
41 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Looks like swarm traps it is. We are talking spring right? I could set them up now but it's probably too late in the season.
 

·
Registered
35
Joined
·
2,125 Posts
Number 1. Watch it thru this winter. No need to get excited about swarms, or worry about gear for traps, till you know they are survivors. We did this on one we found a few years ago, and by mid January, it was clear, nothing survived in there over the winter, but when late April rolled around, and first swarms were happening from managed hives, that entrance suddenly 'woke up' one day.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
535 Posts
#3
You can't get genetics from a trap out. The queen they raise will be from an egg you provide.
When there's a dearth on for a long period I open feed in the yard. Keeps the robbers busy and helps the two local bee trees a little.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
154 Posts
Number 1. Watch it thru this winter. No need to get excited about swarms, or worry about gear for traps, till you know they are survivors. We did this on one we found a few years ago, and by mid January, it was clear, nothing survived in there over the winter, but when late April rolled around, and first swarms were happening from managed hives, that entrance suddenly 'woke up' one day.
:thumbsup:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
245 Posts
Trapout, but DON't put the funnel in. Just let them use the trap box the rest of this year. Come spring, they will consider the trap box part of home and either the old queen or possibly a new queen may start laying in there during the brood-up period. Add a second box on top if needed or start taking frames every 3rd day to start new hives.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Swarm trap next spring. I had exact scenario last summer when I found a bee tree. I set a trap this spring and a swarm moved in soon after.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
41 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Can't wait until next spring!! I can't believe the season is coming to a close soon. Thanks for all the advice.
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top