Beesource Beekeeping Forums banner

1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
194 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I checked some hives today. In one nuc I found 2 queens on the same comb. One had the green mark from last year and the other was unmarked. I didnt see any queen cells on the combs so I think the other queen has been there for a while. I have no idea if she is mated or is viable to be a queen. What would you do? Smash the unknown queen or let the bees figure it out? It will be in the high 60s and low 70s next week.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,649 Posts
Ya, let nature take it’s course. Most likely it’s a supercedure, if there was one that mistakenly lit it that hive she’d be quickly dispatched.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,975 Posts
What you saw is not uncommon. I have seen two young queens laying peacefully inches apart on the same side of the same frame.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
330 Posts
What you saw is not uncommon. I have seen two young queens laying peacefully inches apart on the same side of the same frame.
Vance, how do you know they were young queens? I've seen 2 queens lay on the opposite sides of the frame, but it's always been mother-daughter combo.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,759 Posts
I checked some hives today. In one nuc I found 2 queens on the same comb. One had the green mark from last year and the other was unmarked. I didnt see any queen cells on the combs so I think the other queen has been there for a while. I have no idea if she is mated or is viable to be a queen. What would you do? Smash the unknown queen or let the bees figure it out? It will be in the high 60s and low 70s next week.
Jason, they already figured it out and created a supersedure queen. Or you had 2 all along. If you smash one you will be "deciding" Choose wisely :)
I see no point in doing anything, now. If they get too big split them then, or not. Maybe a good production Hive with 2 queens. Or 1 may not be much and the other is the "main" queen. If mine I would do nothing.
 

·
Super Moderator
Aylett, VA 10-frame double deep Langstroth
Joined
·
5,802 Posts
AGREE, Do nothing. The bees will sort it all out. Eventually, you will end up with just one queen.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Hey Jason I had a hive like that last year and the two queens stayed in there for awhile. Then one day I did a hive inspection and there was only one. The hive will figure out which one to keep hopefully its the better of the two. Not sure on your weather up there in NC and your bee population in that hive but you might think of doing a split. You can then figure out which is the better laying queen and you might luck out and have two good laying queens. Just a thought I would try. If it doesn't work out and one dies then you can just combine the hives.
 

·
Super Moderator
Aylett, VA 10-frame double deep Langstroth
Joined
·
5,802 Posts
I think "Bull of the Woods" refers to any old and experienced beekeeper and not a specific individual, unless it is Crazy Roland himself.:lookout:
 

·
Registered
65 colonies +/- mostly Langstroth mediums, a few deeps for nuc production
Joined
·
439 Posts
If I remember correctly Roland referred to his dad as the "Bull of the woods"
He was The guy in charge
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,294 Posts
The "Bull of the Woods" is the German-Amaerican beekeeper that ran the beekeeping operation. He was blunt and to the point. For example, when cutting wood for bee equipment, the quote is "WE aren't building furniture, just bee houses"

My father would help out with things like comb honey and unpacking; and when bad weather got them behind.

Crazy Roland
 
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
Top