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Yesterday marked the end of my first 10 period using the single strip Formic Pro method. My plan was to put a new strip on for the second 10 day period last night or today but we’ve had a cold snap in Michigan this week and temps have been in the low 50’s at night barely 60’s during the day. Today’s high is predicted to hit 65 (maybe) and we will be back in the low to mid 70’s Friday. I’m concerned about potentially breaking up the cluster/brood area by separating the deeps to place the next dose in these cooler temps. Is it better to wait for the warmer temps or is it more important to get the second dose on as soon as possible? Friday would put me 2 days late but I don’t want to chill new brood either. I’d appreciate any insight anyone can offer.

Thanks!
 

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You will not chill the brood at those temps. No need to remove any frames and literally takes under a minute. It is important you stick to the schedule. J
 

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You will not chill the brood at those temps. No need to remove any frames and literally takes under a minute. It is important you stick to the schedule. J
Go for it-stay on schedule-Fivej talked me off the roof when I had the same concerns last week. I did the double pad and the stuff worked great. It also give you the opportunity to (literally) get a feel on your brood box9es) weight.
 

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I'm taking a different view. Being this late in the season, I wouldn't want to take the chance of losing 1-2 brood cycles, which is typical with formic acid. These are the brood cycles that set up the winter nest and winter bees. I'm so glad I switched to oav. Of course I'm up north and milage may very.
 

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I did the formic double pad on Aug 30th I think, posted it here, as we are going into a strong flow. I think that any loss on brood is due to a varroa infection and treatment killing infected larvae. I did the treatment because even though I had excellent alcohol wash counts, two weeks later I was seeing some DFW on some workers. After/during treatment, here was a reasonable amount of dead, larvae, pupae and workers, it basically got rid of (almost) all of the infected bees. I was told this would happen and was normal by another forum member here. I hope I was lucky and caught it early as the hive is almost back to strength- I had another hive next to it which didn't seem to get it as bad but was also treated, that is very strong and the two are pretty much equaling out now. 10 days out, I'm seeing a lot of emerging foragers doing their orientation flights, it's building back. We're further south of all of you on a coastal plain so were hitting a very strong flow and still two months away from frost. I'm hoping that the FA will get me through this flow and I'm planning a 4 x5 OAV treatment at the end of the month when I pull the supers. I'll then follow up with another single OAV after Thanksgiving when I get a good day. We rarely get any measurable snow here until January.
 
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