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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
New Mexico privet is a native of the SW U.S., Texas to California.

Anybody know if it makes good honey? I have heard privet does not, but I don't know about this species of privet.
 

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Not sure about your species of privet, but I have never understood about "regular" privet not making good honey. I have 2 creeks running across my property, both lined with privet, and the honey I got last year was really good -- of course, I also have a clover field, but the privet is earlier and the bees worked it steadily last Spring. The reason I'm wondering about the privet is that my brother has been after me to clear the creek banks....which I will do if the privet is not actually helping the bees.
 

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I've never pulled honey off from privet, but I've heard both good and bad about it's flavor. Whether or not the honey is good for our tastes or not, is not relevant to privet being good for bees or not. Bees literally cover the privet blooms around my Mom's house as if it was the best meal they ever had. It's gotta be good for the bees, for them to be going after it so voraciously.
 

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Forestiera pubescens is not New Mexico Privet (Forestiera neomexicana). Neither are really privets and are actually more related to olives. True privets are of the genus Ligustrum.

In any case, I have seen bees on New Mexico Privet but it doesn't seem to be a significant nectar source.
 

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The wild privet in my area, blooms late summer. The seeds are just getting ripe, & the birds are eating them. It makes very good honey.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Ah, you are right Ardilla. Not sure where I got the pubescence.
 
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