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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Here in the Bastrop area we had a 34, 000 acre forest fire 2.5 years ago. Took out virtually all the oaks and pines. Now the fire area is coming back with brush and wildflowers everywhere. I think we are seeing a lot of plants that were suppressed for years by the old growth trees.

I am hopeful this will result in a much longer and productive nectar flow. Does anyone have any experience with this situation? What should I, as a new beekeeper, do to be ready?
 

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Fire is not all bad. When we control burn our pine woods it wakes up the forest floor. Months afterwards everything is green and alive. Our flow from gallberry is always stronger the next year following a control burn also blackberry and dewberry.
 

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My daughter volunteered to help with that fire. I'm going to visit her in a few weeks. I'm going to ask for a tour of the fire area! :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Jackam

If you cannot find one drop me a pm. I can probably show you around. May even ask for some bee advice.

Mike
 

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In elk country the herd always flourish in the ten years after a fire because of the extra forage. There's not much forage in old growth forest.

Here in the Ozarks they closed open range in 1968. I recall before that there was widespread burning to promote the growth of livestock forage

Woody Roberts
 

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And checked with the commercial beeks I work for, both 3rd genrration beeks...

Year 3-5 post burn are considered optimal. Weather factors removed (not enough rain at right time, nites too cool, etc), they will predict 1.5 times normal flow those years, more often closer to almost tripl, yhe production norms.

Generally if burn happens near established bee yard they will sit on it lightly year after with more frequent inspection visits, and greatly increase yard #'s year 3 and 4. In between, use all your senses. Walk out 3/4 mile and circle at that distance. Are the flowrrs fragrant? Are they wet w"hen squeezed? What are the local pollinators doing?

"They aren't really rules per say, more like guidelines"

Ymmv, let us know how you do.
 
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