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What catches my eye more than anything else from that study, 100% survival of the colonies that got apivar.....
keep in mind it was a short study in a place with no winter, 100% survival over 60 days, the study didn't go any further
In my location a Sept brood break would likly kill my hives, seems like its not so good for FL either

The data doesn't fit a pre-concieved belief system, so, they will just twist it and re-intepret until they can make it fit
That cuts bolth ways,
In this case the data dosen't fit the trends of other studys, of witch we have many.
People are gravitating to a study that fits there per-concived views, but it seems to be the lone outlier.
Just like small cell fokes hold up the one study thats showed postive results with EHB, ignoring the massive stack of ones that say it has a negative or no effect

will wait on the research to tell us more. Proceed with caution
I can agree with that.
Now if we see this in 2-3 other study's then its a trend, not an outlier

OA treatments using 1g per brood box will not give you a sufficient mite kill -- even when broodless.
but 5-6 years ago it did. The Failure of OAV here, while broodless, suggests the possibility of resistance, Or humidty issues, or?

Further more we know form Toufailia (2016) the dose volume dosen't matter that much with OAV in singles they got 89.2% mite drop from 0.56g and 89.7% drop from 2.25g
 

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I definitely think that Jamie should replicate this study during spring build up and see what the data show.

It certainly shook my preconceived notion of the effects of OAV on a broodless colony.
 

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Discussion Starter #43
Thank you to those who posted studies. Very helpful in the discussion. The survival rate for apivar caught my eye. Florida has a lot of climate zones. Nearly the same latitude change as going from Tallahassee, Florida to Northern Georgia as going from Northern Florida to Southern Florida. I wish mangos and coconuts would grow here. Does anyone happen to know where that study took place?
 

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Thank you to those who posted studies. Very helpful in the discussion. The survival rate for apivar caught my eye. Florida has a lot of climate zones. Nearly the same latitude change as going from Tallahassee, Florida to Northern Georgia as going from Northern Florida to Southern Florida. I wish mangos and coconuts would grow here. Does anyone happen to know where that study took place?
Gainsville Florida
 

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Well... Late to the conversation but a couple thoughts. First, gino (i think) posted about drone brood culling. I like the idea of feeding the chickens but: there is a chance of reinfestation as the foundress mites will still be alive. Best to freeze them first. Not sure if the chickens want dead larvae after freezing. They won't eat the wax so don't worry about that. I'm not sure I agree with drone culling. It will deffinitely reduce mites without chemicals. But it seems it ultimately puts selective pressure on mites that prefer worker larvae. The idea of confining the queen in a broodless colony to a frame and removing/ freezing it when capped would probably "naturally"
remove most mites as they would be eager to infest the new brood. Would be necessary to remove it before the bees started uncapping dead pupae to clean them out as the foundress mites would be released. Any studies? And would be a pita for anyone with many colonies....
Grozzie, We have had 0-85% overwinter loss of untreated colonies. When we ran under 20 colonies our losses were 15% average. Running 60-90 colonies our losses are more like 30-40%, untreated. With one frightening(!) year at 85% loss. I had to think long and hard if I would still remain tf! So I am heartened that our treatment free bees overwinter about as well as yours. And why I write this is that experiences in different places are different. For the study in Florida using any bee is fine for comparison in that situation. However, anyone attempting tf should be getting local tf stock, or as local and tf as possible. And the background genetics will play a role. So no, it probably won't work in all locations, but my experience is that it works fine here. Our colonies usually get 2 brood breaks per year (winter +1) of about 3-4 weeks (when I am behind this is from swarming!). No drone brood culling, no queen caging, no routine requeening (we do of course requeen underperformers). We have bees to sell and more honey than we can get rid of at this point. Working on that!
 
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