Beesource Beekeeping Forums banner

1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
110 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Northeast Beekeepers: After six years of not having my bees winter over I changed the location and 3 out of the 4 are still around. Yeah!! I never give up.
(but took me some to figure it out)
My question is when are you planning to put patties on your hives for spring build up? Since its been a while I can't remember or find my notes from way back when. I was thinking in the next 2 weeks or so. Any help is greatly appreciated.
-----Deb
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
246 Posts
Deb.....congratulations on your succesful new loaction. Did you have to move them far? It's likely that your first spot was low lying, moist cold air sink. South/ Southeast facing areas that are above the lower lying terrain, with windbreak from westerly winds are good,... but perhaps you moved them to an entirely different local with more or better nectar sources.
I start feeding pollen patties in mid to late Feb.
Good luck.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
110 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I moved them a few miles. Where they were before they sat on top of a hill with a line of trees as a wind break. Perfect at first but as the tree line grew in I think is where I developed my problem, not enough winter sun. Wasn't my property and the land owner was firm on where they were to be kept.
Found a new farm and they are in a low lying area so they don't get that winter blast-a little sheltered and full sun. Just wish I didn't wait so long :pinch:
Thanks for your response, the first "decent " day I'll go out and put those on.
----Deb
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
792 Posts
Deb -
No Patties before St Patrick's Day!
that's the rule up here.
And even so, I suggest no patties at all or start on April 1 at the earliest.

If the bees run out of the patties before pollen starts coming in, they've got no way to produce brood food and will have to start cannibalizing the larvae.
that's a bummer of all bummers.

Don't wind them up early - just let them run their natural cycle - it isn't like you are needing to prep up for a southern pollination job or package shaking.

My 2 cents.
-E.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
34,542 Posts
Just being the doomsdayer that I am, denny. It is only february. There is still plenty of time for winter kill to occur. More hives die or are found dead in March then any other month.

Not out of the woods yet.
Good luck dabb.

Mike, et al, what is your criteria for overwinter yard location? My number one is accessability. But southern exposure, north/northwest windbreak, air circulation and solid(not damp) ground are important things to take into consideration.

Accessability is important to me because i move my hives and need to be able to get to them at times of the year when ground conditions may be damp or snow covered.

When I inspected apiaries for NYS, many of the commercial beekeepers had yards that were as far off the road as you could easily drive and then a little farther. Mike has or had some yards like that.

Think about where you are going to put your hives before you place them. apiary location is crucial to how you want to manage your hives.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,290 Posts
Mike, et al, what is your criteria for overwinter yard location? My number one is accessability. But southern exposure, north/northwest windbreak, air circulation and solid(not damp) ground are important things to take into consideration.
I have the same criteria...after I look for forage. Plenty of locations that would be nice locations except for lack of bee forage. I drive by them all the time between yards.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,309 Posts
I would suggest adding to the list of criteria, safety from flooding. It is amazing how many wonderful sites for hives can be subject to a 100-year flood every 5 or 10 years....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
110 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thanks for the concern, no danger of flooding. The land drops down again about 500 yds in front of them, no problem with air circ either as the land slopes gently to the left and to right, while behind them is a steeper slope with a tree line. Sun all day long. Plenty of forage.
The previous site they were at the top of a hill and not enough sun-lost them every winter due to them being unable to break cluster-always plenty of honey left.
Thanks for the pattie advice, with this cold I don't think it will be before April that it will warm up enough to open the hives anyway.
----Deb
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top