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Sugar is less than 50cents pound Canadian so cheaper in US terms. You are paying a fair amount for convenience but it may be worth it. Not mentioned on this thread is the starch content. Starch is not easily digested by bees. Not a problem for spring feeding but may be a concern for shut in winter feeding. Powdered iceing sugar has about 5% starch to keep it free pouring. Dont know if it is included in the making of the commercial fondant.
It isn't. 90/10 creme fondant is 90% sucrose to 10% corn syrup. The ingredients are sugar, corn syrup and water and can be fed any time of year.

I dont feed it often but if I find any light hives in the winter it's very easy to cut off a 5lb slab and lay it on wax or parchment paper with a shim. Bees will tunnel through it similar to ants and leave dried skeleton looking leftovers (best way I can explain it). Just take it out and add another slab if needed. Bees do very well on it.
 

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It isn't. 90/10 creme fondant is 90% sucrose to 10% corn syrup. The ingredients are sugar, corn syrup and water and can be fed any time of year.

I dont feed it often but if I find any light hives in the winter it's very easy to cut off a 5lb slab and lay it on wax or parchment paper with a shim. Bees will tunnel through it similar to ants and leave dried skeleton looking leftovers (best way I can explain it). Just take it out and add another slab if needed. Bees do very well on it.
Thanks for clearing that up. Perhaps the negative was concerning making up a sort of fondant from icing sugar which does contain the starch. The fondant would be convenient to handle that way.
 

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Discussion Starter · #25 ·
Thanks for clearing that up. Perhaps the negative was concerning making up a sort of fondant from icing sugar which does contain the starch. The fondant would be convenient to handle that way.
I was considering straight up sugar but breaking a cluster up slowly but surely I think would end the hive. I think that the fondant sugar.
 

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Discussion Starter · #26 ·
What about fondant mixed with a little grease?
There is a guy on you tube called “The Fat Beeman” which I have seen some of his videos. I wonder if he also uses other things instead of all natural items. I tried some mixing of tea tree oils, lemon grass oils, spearmint oils, in a blender and fed the bees. The only thing is that I wonder if it actually works thou
 

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I think some of the recommendations are no longer on the front burner. Need updating. Most long term successful beekeepers dont subscribe to random feeding of plant oils which in their original purpose was to discourage the producing plant from being eaten. Other words it was a pesticide. A good rule probably "If in doubt, don't"
 

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Discussion Starter · #28 ·
I think some of the recommendations are no longer on the front burner. Need updating. Most long term successful beekeepers dont subscribe to random feeding of plant oils which in their original purpose was to discourage the producing plant from being eaten. Other words it was a pesticide. A good rule probably "If in doubt, don't"
his claim to fame was control the varroa mites naturally. If you have a chance look him up on you tube. I know there are allot of remedies out there however it’s very expensive at the end of the day when things go wrong and loose a hive over it.
What works in Georgia doesn’t mean it works north of the border. They have longer times for bees to collect and winters are not harsh as they are in Michigan and Canada
 

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this is really great with all the input regarding my making a choice with the fondant candy. I can place over the winter and hopeful forget about it since they are in a enclosure.
Does the fondant candy come individually wrapped or in bulk?
I only have experience with Hive Alive patties. They weigh 1 kg, measure 9 X 10, about half inch thick - and come wrapped in a durable plastic (which the bees do not eat). - not inexpensive but they are working for me and my bees.
 

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Someone posted a year or so ago that the natural angle now includes oxalic acid. When your queens can start to lay small patches of replacement brood almost any month, your bees may be able to survive a bit higher mite load. Here with 5 months lockdown and little brood before March, I think you better stay with proven remedies.
 

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Discussion Starter · #32 ·
I only have experience with Hive Alive patties. They weigh 1 kg, measure 9 X 10, about half inch thick - and come wrapped in a durable plastic (which the bees do not eat). - not inexpensive but they are working for me and my bees.
that sounds really good. My local TSC carries this in stock and I think would be a very good supplement when the honey runs low. I have a couple hives that really need nursing to get through the winter due to extreme robbing from my neighbour’s hives. She has Italian whereas I have the carnolians which in my experiences they seem to be the better bee

any thoughts?
 

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that sounds really good. My local TSC carries this in stock and I think would be a very good supplement when the honey runs low. I have a couple hives that really need nursing to get through the winter due to extreme robbing from my neighbour’s hives. She has Italian whereas I have the carnolians which in my experiences they seem to be the better bee

any thoughts?
sorry, this is my first year so I don't know enough about different bees to offer an opinion. :)Enjoy your bees whatever their nationality:)
 
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