Beesource Beekeeping Forums banner
1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
61 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have been making bee fondant for years. For years, for no rhyme or reason, following the same procedure year in and year out--there is a chance any given batch will not solidify-HARD. It happened again and I am frustrated.

I have to place the formed fondant discs on a cookie sheet into a 175 oven for a couple of hours to harden.

Does anyone have any idea why this happens?

The recipe I have always used called for 2 cups of corn syrup ( since the 1940s and some still use it today)...I may cut this in half or eliminate it altogether....everything else is consistent with most fondant recipes.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
61 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I think my recipe may have a touch too much liquid in it cutting back 1/2c water, and half as much corn syrup. So aggravating. This last batch was the worst ever. I can usually bring it back by heating in an oven for a coupke hours but this didnt touch it this time. Luckily i have fondant left over from last season, and will try the updated recipe. I go through the troubke for the bees that i spent all year caring for. The fondant makes an inveryed sugar product that is easier for them to digest and i also fortify. Really just wondering if anyone has played around with the corn surup content... i am not new to making fondant every year. Thanks yall!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,057 Posts
I also gave up making fondant. Too much work but it is definitely better than sugar bricks. Sugar bricks break too easily when compared to fondant. Also, if you use vinegar in the mix, the sugar inverts with the heat and the bees can consume it directly. With bricks, one bee must consume it and then feed to another bee.
That aside, you need to keep the fondant at 234 degrees for 20 - 30 minutes. YOU MUST STIR CONSTANTLY. If you just heat the mixture without stirring, it will turn into a jelly like consistency.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
61 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 · (Edited)
I am about to make a batch tomorrow. I think fondant with just sugar turns out exactly as you say , too crumbly.. i think that is what the corn syrup does, hold it together....so, i think i will go into it with re-tooling the recipe...will report back.
 

·
Registered
Langstroth
Joined
·
87 Posts
I gave up on fondant years ago. Every batch was a failure. I do sugar cakes now and don't regret it.
I've given on anything that requires heating sugar or sugar syrup. I make sugar cakes too (12 parts sugar, 1 part water), which are probably fine for backyard or small scale beekeepers:

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
61 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 · (Edited)
Because I am a small scale bee operation, I can take the time and go the extra distance for my apiary.

i reduced the liquid in my recipe-water from 3c to 2.5c and corn syrup by half-from 2c to one cup.

The other mistake i made was being too cautious not to scorch heating the 10-pound sugar solution-where I should have put more heat into it to bring it to a good rolling boil and back off as it reached 242-(~soft ball stage).

Cutting the liquid and adding sufficient heat produced the fondant that I have made for years.....i think i have it dialed in.

The corn syrup gives the elasticity as I discovered from the guy (above) that only used sugar and water and got a crumbly product. Anyway, it turned out great, a solid granular fondant made of an inverted sugar, fortified with 1/2c ultra bee and 2tbln of HBH.

Ingredient Recipe Serveware Cooking Kitchen utensil
Gas Synthetic rubber Plate Pottery Porcelain
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top