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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This honey is 19% moisture and has been consistently year to year after harvest. In the buckets it was clear and fine but when I poured it into my bottling bucket it got really light in color (air) and when it settled out it had this foam layer and it won’t disapate. Anyone definitively know what it is?
 

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Personally I have not seen much foam on my honey but it could be that I only process spring honey.
I did find this:
"Honey Foam : The White Stuff On Top
Posted on January 9, 2016 by Bean

Honey foam may be one of the most surprising things about the appearance of raw honey. It is often greeted with the words: “What’s that white stuff on top?” Regardless of the raw honey’s form, runny or crystallized, it may be topped with a thin layer of froth, which will solidify in crystallized honey. If you find this honey foam in your jar, consider yourself lucky.

Honey foam is delicious. It is light, flavorful, and packed with air bubbles that have trapped some of the wondrous stuff that is in raw honey: pollen, propolis, wax, and, of course, raw honey."

https://pacificnorthwesthoney.com/honey-foam-the-white-stuff-on-top/
 

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That is more foam than we usually get. If you put saran wrap on it, does it pull off with the plastic? Does it smell fermented? Fermented honey foams because co2 is formed as little air bubbles during fermentation. If it's not fermented: air gets mixed in when you pour it so there is a thin layer of bubbles that float to the top after about a day. Usually not as many bubbles as you have. 19% is high for around here. Did you calibrate right? If it is fermented you can use it and if you have a market for fermented honey, sell it (i don't have a market for it but have heard of some folks paying top dollar for it). I have been happy with keeping the honey by the dehumidifier before extracting if I need to lower moisture content. In NY I believe honey is supposed to be below 18% to sell. It can ferment at that % if it has a lot of yeasts. If it pulls off with the saran wrap and does not smell/taste fermented it is likely particulates (pollen, propolis, wax, etc) mixed with the honey.
 

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I haven't seen you honey but it sounds like it is predominately the wax content is settling to the top of your bucket. I have this most often when I am extracting with honey that's above 18% moisture content. I agree with Amibusiness that plastic wrap works great, but you must recheck for moisture as 19% id a little high at least by my standard. I do do not have this issue when the moisture content is below 18%. I will mix the buckets that are 18% or slightly more with buckets that are below 18% and place them in a heated bottling tank for filling. This also tends to reduce the moisture to an acceptable level.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
So there was no foam, the honey was clear amber 19% on top no foam or debris. I then took that bucket and poured it in my bottling bucket and I could see all the entrained air mixing as it was poured. As the air rose it foamed on top in a matter of minutes 10-20. This is not fermentation in my opinion I have made numerous batches of mead and beer and wines and that’s a bit fast for fermentation ... 10 minutes? But I’ve never seen such seafoam form and it doesn’t taste fermented at all it’s light and fluffy like the first response.
 

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So there was no foam, the honey was clear amber 19% on top no foam or debris. I then took that bucket and poured it in my bottling bucket and I could see all the entrained air mixing as it was poured. As the air rose it foamed on top in a matter of minutes 10-20. This is not fermentation in my opinion I have made numerous batches of mead and beer and wines and that’s a bit fast for fermentation ... 10 minutes? But I’ve never seen such seafoam form and it doesn’t taste fermented at all it’s light and fluffy like the first response.
Could this be a possibility? In fairly recent history on Beesource I think there was mention that some honey with certain properties like content of hydrogen peroxide, may off gas. I did not pay much attention, Perhaps some able searcher?
 

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What did you wash your bottling bucket with before using it?
So there was no foam, the honey was clear amber 19% on top no foam or debris. I then took that bucket and poured it in my bottling bucket and I could see all the entrained air mixing as it was poured. As the air rose it foamed on top in a matter of minutes 10-20. This is not fermentation in my opinion I have made numerous batches of mead and beer and wines and that’s a bit fast for fermentation ... 10 minutes? But I’ve never seen such seafoam form and it doesn’t taste fermented at all it’s light and fluffy like the first response.
 
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