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About a week before we were about to pull frames for extraction, we had a flash flood. We recovered all of the hives and 3 are doing fine after some rehab and swapped out equipment. The other didn't make it.

There are several frames of honey left in that hive. They are still capped and appear to be in decent shape. I don't know whether I should extract it or not. I obviously wouldn't sell it but keep it for home use. My concern though is that the flood water may have contaminated the honey. Suggestions?
 

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Aylett, VA 10-frame double deep Langstroth
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This is just my personal opinion and not a specific recommendation, wash the frames off with cold water. Rinse out any cells that got opened as a result of being tossed about, and extract. Capped honey is sealed in air and water tight cells. I doubt any nasties got into the capped cells. And if I did extract, I would not sell or give away. Just in case.
And there is always the old standby of what to do with questionable honey, MAKE MEAD!
 

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As someone who experienced many Florida floods, you do not want to take any chances with flood waters, there is some real nasty, disgusting stuff that can be in there, some of it can permeate wax. I would freeze those frames and feed them back to the bees. Don't screw around with flood waters. Do you live in an area where people have septic tanks?
 

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Yes, we live in a pretty rural area, so septic is the way of life around here. To be honest, I burned the rest of the frames. Just don't want to throw away the honey unless there's no other use.
 

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Aylett, VA 10-frame double deep Langstroth
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If there is any real doubt in your mind as to the safety of the honey, feed it back to the bees. My earlier comment was based on my own observations of the flooding we sometimes get here in the boonies where the biggest concern is ground based bacteria and mud. A quart or two of bleach does a good job of cleaning up the well and would also work on frames and hive equipment.
 
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