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I have experimented with the FLIR One Pro ($400) camera that attaches to an iPhone.

https://www.flir.com/products/flir-...MIzJOBkMPK4AIVRCaGCh1PFw9BEAQYAyABEgLMr_D_BwE

I did not find it useful for monitoring beehives during the winter, because how the image looked was so highly dependent on the camera's chosen settings. Meaning, a hive could look either alive or dead, depending on the chosen imaging parameters. Consequently, I would have to photograph the hive in question next to hive known to be alive, in order to be able to properly interpret the image. This made it pretty much useless for my application.

Other users have produced useful-looking images, and I could produce great looking images, as well. But, looking at a stand-alone hive, not knowing whether it was alive or dead, the camera was not helpful answering the question of whether it was a deadout.

Maybe my results would be better with a more expensive model, like the C2, but $400 was already pushing my personal cost envelope. And, for $400 I want easy and reliable results, which the FIR One Pro wasn't producing. I returned my FLIR One Pro unit for a refund.

 
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I see what you mean about the Flir One not being too useful for the job at hand. Yes, others have posted what looked like better images that were more distinct. So I guess the question I should have asked was, for those who have posted good thermal definition pictures of live winter hives, what camera and model were you using?
 

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At this point I would much rather go for the C3-X than the C2 because the price for the C3-X is very good, a few hundred cheaper than the C5 and the technology is so much better in terms of resolution, accuracy, sensitivity and cloud connectivity. The C3-X also got positive reviews, so I'm sure i'm not the only who noticed the advantages over a used C2.

As for the difference between the One Pro and the C2, C3 and C5 models, pixel for pixel the images look crisper and sharper on the handheld devices.
 

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5 ,8 ,10 frame, and long Lang
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I have used the Flir 1 with success.
my goals were
live yes no if no pull the hive clean.
where is the cluster if high,, do we need to feed.
Is the cluster split

what clarity do you need that the Flir 1 will not give?

I find it a good tool, have not used the Flir2 so I cannot comment on the differences.

GG
 

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I bought a Flir1 gen 2, it had done a good job letting me know if the hive was alive or not. $199 on amazon.
The one hive is really strong, the other has a cluster that is staying right where it is every time I check. All of my hives have sugar blocks on them. 4 have inhaled a lot of the sugar.
flir_20210108T075953(1).jpg
flir_20210108T080011(1).jpg
 

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Wow, those are some nice images you have! With my crappy Thermal Seek I can only see a blob where the hive is supposed to be (no regular image overlay) that is slightly warmer than the background and that is how I know if the hive is alive... On some hives the top entrance shows a red dot, but ThermalSeek is not good enough to pick that every time. Also I can't use it during the day, only at night otherwise hive body warms up in the sun enough to mask any heat from the bees :-( I can't remember how much I paid for that junk camera, but it was not worth it.
 

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Well it's an old thread.....
Treehouse, I am a bit suspicious of the info in those images. It looks like it's taken at dusk but why are the stones on the hives so hot?
 

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I realize if you want an image, then you probably want an image. However, some kid on another forum turned me onto Govee Bluetooth temp/humidity sensors. They broadcast every 2 minutes and in my case I can check internal temps on each of mine from within our home (have to go to 2 different windows).

It really doesn’t tell me where the cluster is (unless it’s surrounding the sensor), but it tells me they are generating heat. Sensors were $14 each on Amazon and run in a free App by Govee. I think the high-end cameras are really cool, but for my purposes I can “look” in a lot of colonies for very little money. Piece of mind in cold snaps has been great.
 

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but I do know that rocks can get hot
When I was a youngster I spent one summer/fall collecting mountain stone for stone masons to veneer houses. Every morning you would try and guess how long until you found your first copperhead. Maybe once a month you would have a whole day without one, but by 9:30am you usually had come across at least one. They were nocturnal but around 4am they would snuggle up under a rock on a forest floor that was still radiating heat from the day before. You’d better rocks get hot. And without a rain they are like batteries.
 

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Yes rock's get hot and I did not mean he was editing. How much of a battery is a small stone on a hive? The metal covers in the pic are cold and the rocks are as hot as most of the cluster in the fall. I am no infrared expert but it seems like the info is not terribly helpful? ("Well either there is a rock in there or we still have bees" ;)
 

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When using crappy thermal camera during the day or in the evening, there is no way to tell if there are bees or if the boxes, lids, rocks, etc are warm from the sun (even in winter). I have several hives pushed together and one of them is dead, I can barely see the difference in temperature late at night in the middle of winter. I will take a picture next time with my crappy ThermalSeek, but basically the difference between living and dead hive is one shade of yellow and still depends what angle you point it at.
 

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OK, here are few samples

The nuc on the right yellow is most likely dead
62089

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Those are both alive (100% certainty)
62091


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If I manage to get the good view of the top entrance, then I can see something more informative
62093

62094
 

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Has anyone had any experience using a Flir C2 camera for imaging winter hives?
I've used the "Flir One for Android" for a few years now. I get mixed results and the battery dies quickly in the cold. I don't consider it essential to my small scale beekeeping, but it's interesting. I've posted a good number video and photos showing the results here:


62096
highandlow.jpg
highandlow.jpg
 
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