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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Any pointers on this topic. What fishing line type is best? Any other tips appreciated.
 

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I left a question for what test line to use on the other thread. Think it's in 101. FatBeeMan will probably answer soon.

You can search on "foundationless" and get all the info you want that has been left by many here, including me.
 

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Many years ago I "wired" frames with fishing line. The lighter, more flexible test weight worked the best. I initially tried to wrap the line around a nail tapped into the side bar. It takes three hands.

Then I switched to making a simple loop, then tapped in the nail to start the process. After pulling the line tight, I wrapped the taut line around the second nail and tapped it in. That worked okay, but did come loose on some frames. Monofilament is too slippery.

The best way I got the line to stay tight was to measure fairly carefully, tie double-overhand loop knots in both ends. I tapped two nails in the side bar, threaded and stretched the line tight, then looped the loops over the nails before tapping them in.

Monofilament has some flexibility to it that allows you to stretch it out and it stays tight.

In the long run, real wire seemed to work best. It didn't seem to make any difference to the bees. Over time, I find some of those older frames and the monofilament has aged and snapped.

Grant
Jackson, MO
 

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go with wire, less hassle and longevity is better. Bees build right around it.
 

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I am a NewBee also, but I did 20 frames with 30lb test line. I used a air stapler and made an X shape plus ran across the top and bottom holes. I did it all in one section. I started at one end and strung it all the way thru, stapled the end then tightened it back to the other end and stapled it, then cut off the end.

I used 30lb because that is what was in my tackle box.

It didnt take very long, maybe 30 minutes to do all 20.

Good Luck
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 · (Edited)
Thanks guys. I just remember watching the fatbeeman video, and seeing some talk about it on here. I'm sure wire and fishing line have pros and cons. I'm just doing some thinking and asking.
 

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"Really aggravates me when folks answer a question with a question, no offense to anyone, just comes across arrogant when you do that, especially to us new to the business."

I don't think you got an question for an answer? The question was as valid as yours. He just didn't understand why anyone would have a reason to go to fishing line.

The reasons are not just a price savings on wire to line. But time to setup and wire frames. It does take a lot longer to wire a frame with wire. I haven't used line, but as a fisherman, I know it would take a lot less time. It would be easier to get your foundation support taught. There is no need of a frame device to assist in wiring. There is no need to have eyelets.

I guess it is just a preferance. I will probably try it just to see how it works and holds up. My testing it will probably be in foundationless frames where the support of the comb is more critical when using an extractor.

Besides, to me it's fun to try different ideas. Don't want things to get booring. Nor do you want to get stagnant in learning. So trying something that is not a mission critical choice to your hives is interesting. Its always good to have options. You might be at a point where you need some frames wired ASAP and you don't have any wire. But you might have some fishing line or maybe even some dental floss.

You know the girls always like to have a nice smile. ;)
 

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no1cowboy... fishing line is cheaper when its the stuff you just pulled of your fishing reels for their annual tuneup. one old spool of 150 yards will do a lot of frames.
 

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Besides, to me it's fun to try different ideas. So trying something that is not a mission critical choice to your hives is interesting. Its always good to have options.
I agree 100% and I'll try anything once, maybe twice. If it works better, I'll switch. But not every idea I've tried is worth pursuing, nor is the "tried and true" necessarily worth abandoning just because it's the way we always did it.

That's what I like about beekeeping: lots of options and the bees are the true judge as to what works. They'll tell you without any kind of bias!

And another thing: Two beekeepers can try oppositional ideas and both be right! Debates and discussions don't need to be adversarial. I'm here to learn and to share what I've learned. Take me with a grain of salt.

So why would I (why did I) try fishing line? Because I won't know if it's a better option unless I try it under my conditions and my level of ineptitude.

Grant
Jackson, MO
 
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