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I went into winter with two hives and fed them both. The weaker one came out much, much stronger, with a deep and two mediums of brood. The one that was stronger going into winter ended up totally collapsing! Both entrances had Boardmans, then plywood entrance reducers so that the entrance is 1 bee wide. A week ago there were at least some bees in the hive and I was planning on splitting the stronger one and nursing the other back to health. Oh well.

So after we discovered that #1 had collapsed (note that it had a med super full of capped syrup/honey, a deep about half full of syrup and the bottom deep had a couple frames with capped syrup as well - so they didn't starve), then I decided to do a 3 way split and try to equalize at the same time.

I evened out the deep supers, putting the honey frames on the outside, then dealt the boxes of brood from the strong hive out like Michael Bush suggested. On top of the med boxes of brood I put the equalized deeps. On top of the deep brood box, I put a new undrawn med, then a queen excluder, then the med super full of syrup/honey, then another honey super that they had started drawing out the week before.

So, this is sort of a walkaway split. Is there anything that I need to do or not do? I've read Bush write about equalizing the drift by swapping hive positions within the first 10 days. I am also suspicious that robbing may have been a factor in the demise of my hive so we just out Vicks vaporub around the entrances of all 3 hives tonight.

This is our first split, so any advice is welcome. I assume that we should not feed them since redbud, purple deadnettle, Bradford pear, dandelions, forsythia, etc are blooming and they all have some resources? Do we just keep an eye out for robbing and check the # of bees to see which ones to swap position? Do we just leave them and check in 4 weeks?
 
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