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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I want to obtain certification regarding first aid treatment of stings. I can't seem to locate anything locally. Does anyone have a suggestion?
 

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I guess the first question is, "Why?"
The desire to obtain certification implies the existence of a certifying body. So perhaps you should start with the body from which you seek certification. If none exists, then back to the basic question, "Why?"

And if none exists, and you want to do it, why not do research in the "bibles" - "ABC's" and "The Hive and the Honey Bee" and elsewhere about stings, and establish sting treatment protocols, then take your protocols to your local certifying organization, and see what they say.
Just some thoughts...
Steven
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I guess "certification" is a strong word. I wish to be formally educated so that I can provide first responder care to those with extreme allergic reactions to stings.

I own a small farm with a number of visitors. We also manage a small nonprofit that offers farm based programs to "at risk" children. In the off chance that someone is stung, I will sleep better knowing that I am trained to identify and treat anaphalatic shock until EMS arrive (I live waaaay out from town, so...)

Does that make sense?

I thinking about your response, I guess that a local doctor could "train" me, huh?
 

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I have been a Paramedic for 20 plus years. On the level of first responder sting care, I think you will find no training related just to that. I recommend a 40 hour first responder class. But your still limited to Basic ABC'S of patient care. Paramedic level training is were you will be able to give medication for sever reactions, but thats only under direct orders from a Doctor. Write your own protocol, to include calling 911 first !!! Then protect the patients Airway, Breathing, circulation. You can learn those very basic skills from the American Red Cross First aid training. Just a thought.... I would look more into keeping people away from areas that they might get stung.............
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Good advise. Thank you.

I was leaning toward the Red Cross... Seems like a prudent exercise given where I live.

A
 

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Another consideration is whether your operation fits your state's definition of "day camp" or child care facility in regard to your children's programs. if so, the state will tell you exactly what certification is necessary for staff members and what equipment is needed on site.
 

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downthehill, ah, now I understand! Makes very good sense. I think the advice about minimizing probability of anaphylactic reaction or stings is dead on. I would be extremely reluctant to administer to someone else an epi-pen, you might set yourself up for a serious lawsuit.

Many folks say they are allergic to bee stings, when they simply swell up, as do most of us. When someone tells me they're allergic, I ask what happens? How do you react? Then I explain the differences in the reactions...between normal, and life-threatening. If you have a working "tourist" farm, or like a petting zoo, you might want to think about having visitors sign waivers, or some such, to protect yourself.

I think you're wise to get any Red Cross or other training... and maybe link up with your EMT's and 911 service, to see what they'd advise in case of a serious reaction. If you are prepared to administer approved treatment, and do so while on the phone with an EMT or some such, that would certainly help, and might protect you under any Good Samaritan Laws. But then again, you simply might want to check with local legal counsel. Of course, they might respond "Are you NUTS!" :lpf:

Sounds like a neat place you have there!
Steven
 

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I am an M.D. and a beekeeper. In the STRONGEST possible terms, I would recommend that you stay away from attempting to do what MAY become a medical emergency. I second above reply where you should seek legal counsel for an attempt to set up a 'practice' of treating bee stings.
N.B. We use our bees for apitherapy for ourselves. In our first hiving, we were stung accidently and found our aches and pains and stiff fingers improved dramatically. We've been stinging ourselves on a regular basis ever since! We do NOT sting anyone else. The risks are too high.
So, again, why would anyone want to set up a practice treating bee stings? You might do better setting up a practice for apitherapy. in an approved State with licensing.
Btw, training on treating bee stings would be helpful if you will be working in a summer camp or outward bound type of situation.
We do not advocate apitherapy for anyone outside a doctor's direct supervision.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I don't want to start a practice to treat them, only to learn how to properly respond if someone is accidentally stung and has a severe reaction to the venom.

We are set up such that no one "should" enter the apiary. No plan is 100% fool proof. There will be customers on the farm. We will have friends and there children out here as well.

My question is directed at addressing concerns related to how I might help someone experiencing a severe reaction until EMS arrive.

I want to be clear, this question was asked only to seek advice regarding a location where we can be trained so that we are not unprepared if something bad happens. Stings or cuts or any other farm related accident.

I decided to go with the ARC training and signed up today. Seems to be the best general option.
 

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With all due respect, if you have people on the farm who are touring? or visiting, that sets up a known (to you) risk. I would seek legal advice about how to handle the situation. As you point out, nothing is 100% foolproof. Just having some training does not absolve you of responsibilities or liabilities.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I appreciate your feedback. I agree with your suggestion regarding legal council. I would clarify that our farm is no different than most co-ops in our region--we are a working farm that happens to manage bee hives for polination.
 

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Don't know if this info is useful to you or not but in setting up our conservation yard/group, we created a release form that all visitors and beekeepers and potential beekeepers must sign before entering the property. Basically the release form states that the signor knows they are entering a known honey bee keeping location and they are aware of the real likelihood of being stung so they are on entering of their own informed choice. don't blame us.

Our rule is that absolutely no one is admitted into the beeyard unless the signed release is on file.

Also, everyone is told before they enter the beeyard for the first time that they need to be absolutely sure about their medical situation regarding bee stings. If they need to visit a doctor to determine if they do have an allergy and do need their own epi-pen, it needs to happen before they step into the beeyard.

In our situation, the entry to the beeyard is limited and controllable so we do have means to enforce access rules, your situation may be different.

Big Bear
 

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Also, everyone is told before they enter the beeyard for the first time that they need to be absolutely sure about their medical situation regarding bee stings. If they need to visit a doctor to determine if they do have an allergy and do need their own epi-pen, it needs to happen before they step into the beeyard.
Big Bear

According to my doctor, this is nearly impossible if you have never or rarely been stung. I found this out when I asked for an allergy test prior to starting beekeeping this spring. She told me that even if she administered the test, it would not likely be accurate regardless of the results, as I have only been stung once in my life, when I was a toddler (one of my earliest memories.)
 

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I am a State Trooper, a Fire Chief of a volunteer fire department and an EMT-Basic. All of the advice you have received is spot-on. I will stay away from the legal issues and advice of council and get to the heart of your question..

Besides the Red Cross, get to know someone with your local fire department or ambulance service and see if they can teach/show you some basic signs and symptoms of shock and a little about ABC's (Airway Breathing-Circulation). Check and see if your local Vo-Tech or other entity offers a First Responder class. This is good, basic medical knowledge to have for just your own family.

Check and see if your local medical responder (FD or Ambulance) has paramedics or just EMT-Basics. You need to be aware that First Responders and EMT-B's CANNOT carry Epi-Pens or over-the-counter Benadryl and can only administer it with permission of the patient/guardian IF they need assistance for it to be administered. Know what level of care provider would be responding in an emergency shock situation. I WOULD NOT seek to keep an Epi=Pen or Benadryl on hand and administer it yourself (Excluding your own family, with DR Approval). You are inviting a law suit in that regards. It is better to have some basic knowledge of shock treatment and airway management at a layman's level than attempting to administer the above mentioned WITH medical training at anything less than a Paramedic, in my opinion. Last but not least, learn CPR.... Hope this helps.
 

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According to my doctor, this is nearly impossible if you have never or rarely been stung.
From a couple of discussions I have had with a nurse and the doctor who used to golf with my group, I was informed that when people go through a battery test to find out about allergies, bee venom is one of those they test for as part of the 'regular' battery.

From what I was told, this is where they actually expose patients to minute traces of each possible thing they might be allergic to.

I'm sure, like beekeepers, ask 5 doctors and you can get 6 answers.

Big Bear
 

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Could be. My doc told me that the reason it doesn't mean much is that generally the allergic reaction takes exposure to the allergen to develop. If you have never been stung, you have never been exposed, and therefore the reaction has not had a chance to develop.

I *think* what she was saying is that if you test positive for bee sting allergy, you are allergic, but just because you do not test positive does not mean that you aren't, but I may be completely off base.

I told her that I have only been stung by a bee once, about 36 years ago and all I had from it was pain and a bit of swelling. Even with a father and two siblings who are allergic, her advice to me was to not worry about it, and just keep benedryl on hand and be prepared for a trip to the doctor if I get stung.

It may be worth mentioning that my doc is a D.O. and they tend to have a different outlook than most M.D.s...
 
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