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Tenbears I'd like to spend a couple of weeks with you. Well after I get more than just started with bee's (have no honey yet and never attempted mead) and actually have honey to burn.
Figure out what I think is dry vs. a recipe's dry, not making one to stout and ending up on the floor (kidding) etc....
 

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I'm a beer man. Wife pretty much doesn't drink. Neither of us like a real dry wine. I don't like Sangria. She likes a Boones Farm type and I don't mind them. A little sweet taste is what I'd like. Without a High alcohol%

It seems looking at this thread and the Begineers guide at the top of this forum sweet means more alcohol depending on the yeast ability yes but??? Can you make your nice after dinner wine as what I think I'd like, not to high in alcohol% ???
I'm new and interested.
 

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I'm a beer man. Wife pretty much doesn't drink. Neither of us like a real dry wine. I don't like Sangria. She likes a Boones Farm type and I don't mind them. A little sweet taste is what I'd like. Without a High alcohol%

It seems looking at this thread and the Begineers guide at the top of this forum sweet means more alcohol depending on the yeast ability yes but??? Can you make your nice after dinner wine as what I think I'd like, not to high in alcohol% ???
I'm new and interested.
Take this from a beginner, but one with enough chemistry and biology education to make sense of it. There are tables that predict all this, but everything is linked.

How much alcohol you CAN POSSIBLY get is set by the amount of sugar in the original mix, which you can get roughly by measuring out your honey and water, but should check and adjust just right by hydrometer to check specific gravity. They call this "potential alcohol". You look this up on tables you find in mead-making guides, or can calculate it.

But there is also a limit of how much alcohol the yeast can tolerate. So if you have enough sugar for 18% alcohol, and you use a yeast that can only handle 14%, you get 14% and sugar left over. If you have enough sugar for 14% alcohol and put in a yeast that can tolerate 18%, you can expect a dry result.

You also measure specific gravity when done, to determine the alcohol and sugar content. But the ultimate test is to taste it.

There are too many guides on line to shake a mouse at, but they say about the same thing.

I would say, if you want just a little sweet and not too much alcohol, start with a low alcohol tolerance yeast, set the initial sugar content, by adding honey and checking with the hydrometer, to give a potential alcohol level about equal to what the yeast can tolerate. Do your primary fermentation (typically about three weeks). At that point, most processes call for racking the liquid over to fresh containers. You can try a sip (it will be yeasty) and also check specific gravity. If it is too dry, you can add some honey at this point. Then let the fermentaton finish.

If you have a wine you consider to be just the right sweetness, you could measure the SG of that and use it as a target SG for your mead.

Hopefully, once this is done you have a pretty good idea of how sweet the end product will be.

Most meads I've tried made by others tend to be a little sweeter than typical dinner wines, although not as sweet as a dessert wine such as a port.
 

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Can you make your nice after dinner wine as what I think I'd like, not to high in alcohol% ???
I'm new and interested.
Phoebee hit it. You could also ferment to dryness, then stabilize using a combination of sorbate and sulfite.... this will allow adding more honey to taste that won't re-initiate fermentation. Low alcohol meads are absolutely possible but have a couple caveats: they don't age very well typically, and may not have a "mead-like" mouthfeel from the low ethanol. But both of these considerations are individual: I've made plenty of low-alcohol meads that were very enjoyable even if they'd lose points in a competition. We make our own meads for our own tastes, not always/only to satisfy the "swirl police" :D.
 
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