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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
i extracted my honey last year and sealed it in air tight 5 gallon containers. I went to bottle the honey today and at the bottom of the container, there is a thick creamy substance. Not sure if this is normal. Looks like thick cream.
 

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Could be one of two things. First crystallization-all honey eventually crystalizes over time-higher moister, quicker crystallization. Two-it may have settled out and your seeing wax particle's (with some crystallization.) Try bottling with a ladle and work your way down through the bucket-the bottom is still good too, just different.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Could be one of two things. First crystallization-all honey eventually crystalizes over time-higher moister, quicker crystallization. Two-it may have settled out and your seeing wax particle's (with some crystallization.) Try bottling with a ladle and work your way down through the bucket-the bottom is still good too, just different.
It looks very creamy. The honey has a fruity flavor. I strained the honey off the top and left the settled creamy stuff in the bottom. Not sure what to do……
 

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What you have is crystalized honey.

It brings in a premium if you can find the market for it.

To get it back to a liquid form it needs a little heat, there are several ways to do this, I myself like a water bath, think double boiler set up. Would not heat water to over 100* F (just me, others will have different reasons).
bucket band heater, heated blanket, sit in the car on a sunny day, insulated box with a light bulb in it (can add fan and thermostat also), etc, etc

Creamed honey needs to be smooth, not grainy or chunky, plenty of good post on this.

Just need to heat it up a little or find that niche market.

I find you can get more on a biscuit if it is crystalized. 😄
 
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I took the crystalized honey heated it in a crock pot, it turned liquid again, but, it has this creamy surface of think cream.
I skimmed it off and the honey underneath looks amazing. what is the creamy stuff and can I use it for anything?
 

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How long did you let it heat up?
Get it warmed up and then turn the crock pot off, let it sit over night.
It takes a little time to melt the crystals down.

or

it could be wax, depending on how you extracted your honey and filtered it.
 

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Could be one of two things. First crystallization-all honey eventually crystalizes over time-higher moister, quicker crystallization. Two-it may have settled out and your seeing wax particle's (with some crystallization.) Try bottling with a ladle and work your way down through the bucket-the bottom is still good too, just different.
I always thoght lower moisture was quicker crystilzation.
 

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The cream on top is probably just fine foam. There are little bits of protein and other things floating around in raw honey and get can get kicked up when you try to bottle, filter, or otherwise manipulate honey. As long as it doesn't smell like alcohol, you are good to go.
 

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Crystallization is more a property of the make up of the sugars in the honey than the water content. (Dextrose, Sucrose, Glucose, etc.)

Don't be poo pooing crystalized honey. Many prefer crystallized honey, in fact. :)

The foam that forms on top of honey is just harmless hydrogen peroxide released by the honey's anti-bacterial qualities.
It can be removed by laying a piece of saran wrap across the top of the honey, it will adhere to the plastic wrap when you lift it.
 

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I always thoght lower moisture was quicker crystilzation.
I have seen that written before too but I think it is result confused with cause. :unsure:
When the honey crystallizes the liquid portion is somewhat starved by the sugar going into the crystals and the liquid portion remaining will read a higher moisture content than pre crystallization. This separation can lead to fermentation if the liquid portion contains sufficient yeasts etc.
 
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