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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Today will be my first hive inspection. I've put it off because of weather issues. First it was cold, rainy and cloudy. Now it is windy. But I really need to make sure the queen is laying and check on the pollen patty. My install was on April 22 and I haven't opened the inner cover of hive yet. The winds are suppose to be 20-25 today, is it ok to inspect the hive? It is sunny and it will be 65. Is there anything I should be prepared for on a windy day?

Yes, I'm paranoid, nervous, anxious and all the things you are probably thinking. And yes, I worry a lot!
 

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Here is what I would do. Other opinions sure to follow...

If you installed the package with the queen in a cage you need to get in and make sure she's been released. If you got a nuc or did a direct release then I would not worry about an inspection and wait for better weather. I know you're anxious to see what's going on but odds are everything's fine.

If you do need to check on the release of the queen I would not bother with smoke because it will blow away anyway. The colony should be focused on setting up house anyway and not care too much about you. Only open the top cover and remove the queen cage and let her out if she's not out already. Don't pull frames just to look.

Now that I think about it, you must know she's out if you're concerned about checking for eggs. I'd let it go until better weather and then take your time to check things out the way you want to.
 

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Pixie,
I've been watching your posts and am excited for you!! I've been a member since '04 and you have twice as many posts as I do. Which tells me you'll probably be a better Beek than I am. Having said that, I checked your forecast, 78 Tuesday. You could wait. But, like the ladies, the weather won't always cooperate and perfect conditions aren't always available during inspections.

However, if you haven't seen the empty cage yet, you're probably to the point of losing sleep. I'd be willing to bet the queen is free. The biggest problem you have now is that the girls are building burr comb in the space caused by the cage. The sooner you get it out, the less burr comb you'll have to remove.

Last note: Relax. My wife and I have been in our hive dozens of times and onlly been stung once. If you go in today, be expeditious. Or Tuesday, when its really nice, you can take more time to look at each frame.

Good luck,
Ed.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thank you for the advice! :)

I was just checking replies before we went out to the hive. We did a direct release of our queen and she crawled nicely out onto the frame (april 22).

The current temp is 64 (and it is almost 2 pm). Tons of clouds moved in and it is pretty windy (didn't expect the clouds). I'm going to heed the advice of you with more experience and wait til a better day. Tuesday is suppose to be good :) I'll go check on the syrup levels and switch that out if needed.

Is it at all possible the bees, after 10 days, could have drawn out 80% of the hive and want more space?

Thanks you for confidence building ~ it means the world to me! :gh:
 

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I'd be really surprised if your bees would draw out 7 or 8 frames in 10 days. My first hive took all summer to draw out 16 frames out of 20. They never did start on the two outside frames of either deep. I caught a swarm that drew out 8 frames in one deep in about 12 weeks. The top deep was finished quicker which I attribute to the larger number of bees then and a great late summer flow.

BTW, the swarm had almost twice the number of bees as the package.

Be patient and good luck. If they did draw out 8 frames in 10 days, start splitting and selling nucs. You'll have the fastest bees ever! :)

BB
 
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