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Hello Group

I've kept bees off and on for several years in norther Michigan, sometimes getting a hive through the winter but more often not. After moving to North Carolina I decided to try again. One of three hives made it through the winter in great shape. When I checked in early spring the hive was packed with brood but very little honey stores left. I fed them as much as they could take, then made two splits from that colony. All three are doing well (again, feeding until local resources were abundant).

The original hive is going like gangbusters and I have a deep hive body and three mediums on it. When I had to place the fourth medium, I put it under the third which was full to the edges. Using a bee escape I managed to clear it and take it off for extraction, no problem. The girls didn't even seem to know I was there!

Extraction went well and I ended up with 25 - 30 lbs of honey. Uh-oh, it's really quite light and I suspect it may have some sugar syrup mixed in. I was pretty sure I put that super on after I stopped feeding, but, well, there it is.

It tastes ok, but I'm thinking I should leave it sealed in the buckets and possibly feed it back to them in the fall. Any suggestions? Maybe it's just really light because it's early honey?

Feel free to offer your opinions, but be gentle! It was at least good experience at removing and extraction! Oh, btw, they have another medium 60% filled that I'm sure is ok. I put the extracted medium back on the hive under it.
 

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It is possible that it is the local variety of plants make thin/light honey.

I found this article in a quick search:
https://honeybeesuite.com/the-color-of-honey/

There are probably better articles out there, but this one describes the colors.

Another thing you can do in the future is dye your syrup before feeding it. I have several frames that are green from giving my hives green syrup, so it makes it really easy to tell that those frames are not honey. I am not sure if this is a common practice, or if there are any long term side effects since this is the second year I have dyed syrup.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
It is possible that it is the local variety of plants make thin/light honey.

I found this article in a quick search:
https://honeybeesuite.com/the-color-of-honey/

There are probably better articles out there, but this one describes the colors.

Another thing you can do in the future is dye your syrup before feeding it. I have several frames that are green from giving my hives green syrup, so it makes it really easy to tell that those frames are not honey. I am not sure if this is a common practice, or if there are any long term side effects since this is the second year I have dyed syrup.
Thanks for the information. Maybe I just have "delicate flavored" honey!

g
 
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