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Re: b) First equipment & supplies to obtain

I've bought used hives and repainting is a must,, is there a particular paint I should not use and should I prime the boxes first.. I asked about painting in the welcome thread but no one gave me any direct information, dont want to use anything that would harm the bees..really really new to this.. please help.
 

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Re: b) First equipment & supplies to obtain

ok thanks when I get all the equipment on my list that didnt come in this package deal I'll get back with ya on the dippin and drippin..initial start up for me gonna be HONEY WHERE"D ALL MY MONEY GO ... lol
 

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Re: b) First equipment & supplies to obtain

Has anyone mentioned that if you are going to feed -- and you WILL want to feed -- you need an extra hive body to put the feeder in. An extra hive body for each hive is best. It doesn't matter if you are using a special feeder insert, a bucket, or a collection of smaller jars, they really work best when inside an extra box.

Some people buy a fancy feeder that comes in its own box, which is fine if you're into recreational shopping. Some people use one of those entrance feeders which is a bad idea (my opinion). Some people try to do exterior feeding which is probably best left to experienced beeks.
 

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Re: b) First equipment & supplies to obtain

fancy feeder that comes in its own box
Most of the members here are hobbyists, so I guess that would mean they do "recreational shopping".

I prefer "Miller-Style" hivetop feeders which do not require any additional box.

I would strongly suggest that people buy extra boxes and perhaps a complete nuc-hive to have in reserve.
 

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Re: b) First equipment & supplies to obtain

I Like to use 3 widemouth quart jars with little tiny holes poked in the lid set on top of 3/4x1/2X about 18" long. I set the wood on top of the inner cover from front to back like railroad ties close enough together for the jars to sit on lids down.spread from fronnt to back running right over the center hole.Then I put on a deep box than the outer cover. Note I do use plywood inner covers not the cheep crap that saggs.
 

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Beginner kits

So what are the thoughts on buying a "beginner's kit" that just about every on-line supplier offers?

The price is right but are they a good investment or a waste of money for a beginner?
 

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Re: b) First equipment & supplies to obtain

I am in kinda the same boat where I am just getting in to this and I was looking at the kits and what I found is while they seem like a great deal, and some are, most seem to have bits and pieces that are either not needed or lower quality. It really depends on the company you are looking at. I personally found that I could put together my own "kit" for the same or less and get exactly what I wanted. You just have to shop around.
 

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Re: b) First equipment & supplies to obtain

I just bought my first hives/equipment and ended up going with a kit because in the end it seemed the cheapest (but not by a lot) route. Building my own was not going to be an option. I wanted two hives to start and I found that by selecting a kit intended for one hive and supplementing it a la carte I could create two hives. It was a bit cheaper to go that route than to buy a la carte all the parts I would need for the same two hives. The only thing it included that I did not want was an excluder; I did not buy one for the second hive. But I figured that was probably a good thing to have on hand, even if I didn't plan to use it. Oh, it also had smoker fuel, which I wouldn't have purchased otherwise. But the equipment was minimal: veil, gloves, hive tool, smoker. I didn't buy any additional equipment, though I'm now thinking I maybe should have gotten a brush.

It took me over a year to decide because every time I was sure of what I wanted, I would hear/read something that changed my mind. I finally decided I just had to go for it and accept that in the end I'd simply spend some time thinking 'I should have bought ___ instead.' (In fact, in the end the decision of what kind of hive to start with -- I wanted either Langstroth or TB -- was decided by the fact that I am able to buy a nuc locally, which was much more attractive to me than shipping in.)

Also, I had to get the ball rolling because I contacted my county P&Z to check out any local regulations and I was told they were currently working on language for a code that would limit beekeeping and likely would include getting a special use permit for any number of hives. As it was, they said I could only do one or two without contacting them again and I can not sell any product (not that I planned that, but...). I wanted to be sure I got set up before they get a code in place so I would be grandfathered in.

Sometimes you just have to go for it and hope for the best! :)
 

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Re: b) First equipment & supplies to obtain

You are so right, papa bear! Attitude is important. Be crazy, but don't be stupid. Popping a lid might seem crazy to most folks, but not wearing a veil to do it is just plain stupid. A little smoke helps.
 

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Re: b) First equipment & supplies to obtain

A veil, this can be mosquito netting from a sporting goods store with a full brimmed hat.

Bee jacket, or a long sleeve jacket. Can also use painter's coveralls.

Gloves of some kind. Latex or Dish washing gloves will work. Gloves can be tapped to sleeves to stop bees from crawling under them.

A Smoker. You can burn most things in it, sticks, dry grass, leaves, paper, cardboard, clean rags.

Hive tool. This is just a flat pry bar/scrapper you can find in a hardware store.

Hive stand of some kind, 2x4s, 4x4s, bricks, cinder blocks.

Bottom board, solid or screened.

Hive bodies, two deeps or 3 mediums.

Feeder. Hive top feeder, or a container with small holes punched in it placed over the inner cover or division board with a empty supper placed over it.

Hive cover. Either a migratory cover ( flat sheet of ply wood) or an Inner cover and Telescoping cover.

A rock or strap to hold the cover on the hive.

A package of bees.
 

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Re: b) First equipment & supplies to obtain

"I didn't buy any additional equipment, though I'm now thinking I maybe should have gotten a brush."

A turkey or goose wing feather works well too, except the bird may object; I found mine on the ground while walking around.
 

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Re: b) First equipment & supplies to obtain

You'll always want more than you actually need. When I sell a beginners kit, it includes the following:

Hive:
1 - hive stand
1 - screened bottom board w/ mite count tray
1 - entrance reducer
1 - entrance feeder or division board feeder
1 - deep 10-frame hive body w/ frames and Duragilt foundation
1 - metal queen excluder
1 - medium 10-frame honey super w/ frames and plastic beeswax-coated foundation
1 - inner cover
1 - outer cover

Tools and Equipment:
1 - hat/veil combo
1 - pair of gloves
1 - 10-inch hive tool
1 - smoker
(order package bees separately)

This is generally enough to get a beginner through the first year. In the spring of the second season, you would order a second deep w/ frames & foundation, and probably some extracting equipment.
 

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Re: b) First equipment & supplies to obtain

Mentoring a young lady (14?) that needs a jacket/veil combo, any recommendations welcome.
 

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Re: b) First equipment & supplies to obtain

I ordered a cheaper jacket/veil from mannlake about $40 for my 8 year old son and it has served him well. I ordered it a couple sizes large and he tucks it in to his pants. The kids gloves they sell fit him well.
 

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Re: b) First equipment & supplies to obtain

I Like to use 3 widemouth quart jars with little tiny holes poked in the lid set on top of 3/4x1/2X about 18" long.
I found it simple enough to use gallon ziplock bags in a empty super on top for feeding. Once you have it placed just poke it with a few slits using a box cutter. The nice thing is that the bag remains air free while its in use so the syrup keeps well.
 
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