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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have the opportunity to do my first cutout. I have watched a lot of videos on YouTube. My question is after you vacuum the bees up and cutout the brood frames how long do you have before the brood dies especially the open brood. Also do you guys dump the bees from the vacuum at the removal site of at the new apiary? Thanks
 

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Survivor stock & Buckfast in Langstroth 8F’s
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There is quite a bit about doing cutouts you aren’t going to see on YouTube. You will need blank frames, rubber bands, and spare deeps for brood if you are wishing to save it. The cells of the comb must be oriented correctly when doing so or the bees won’t use it. You are going to have to scrape all wax from location and spray to remove pheromones. If not another swarm may move in. Bee’s are moved from the vacuum to a suitable hive. You must make sure to capture the queen. Then seal up bee entrance points the best you can. Not trying to talk you out of it, but unless you have a plan to take care of all the above, you may really reconsider. Judging by the questions above, I would suggest taking someone with experience with you on your first cut out just incase. One other thing to consider as I don’t know what state you are located in is your state laws and regulations. In TX for example you have to have a permit to transport bees across county lines etc. Hope this helps some
Cody
 

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Honey Hive Farms: We deliver bee packages, queens & bulk honey in 8 states
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We really do not vac the bees off of brood. I think you should move the bees over into a box and not vac them up. Vacuum the left over bees after you have moved the frames over.
IF you can find the queen be careful with her, maybe put her in a clip.
Lastly,, I would do all bee cut outs at dusk or night as all the field bees are back in OR after you have taken all the bees a collector hive and come back and get that at night.
Good luck, take it slow.
 

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Possum Valley, TN Bee Wrangler
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For doing your first cut out on your own, can I ask where they are located.......easy to get to or difficult to reach? It will make a difference for sure, it can be over whelming in a difficult place to reach.

What kind of bee vac do you have? If it is a plastic bucket type I would be extra careful on overheating the bees. Don't be afraid to sprinkler water on the bees to help them cool off.

Have you actually been to where the bees are and figured out where they are located in the structure?
How to open the structure?
Do you have to do repairs?
Could there be hidden things inside like water pipes, electrical wires, etc.?
Where the cut out is located, is it in a public area with people walking close by?
Do you need ladders, scaffolding or boom lift?
Can I use smoke?...........inside of building with smoke detectors?
Can you stand the heat of a bee suit for hours on end?

Brood is pretty tough, I have kept them for several hours while doing the cut out. Keep out of direct sun and out of the A/C. I combine bees back with the brood frames when I get back to the bee yard.

Not trying to bust your bubble by any means but you are asking some pretty basic questions that you should already have a good handle on before doing a cut out. Good idea to maybe find somebody to tag along with. Good advice above, not sure I would do a cut out at night though. Some times you will see the queen and sometimes not, she could be inside the bee vac. If you plan on catching the queen do you have a queen clip? or empty queen cage and are comfortable enough to pick her up and put her into it?
 

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Just so its said....
You are using/going to use an actual "bee vac" correct? Ive seen youtube videos using a shopvac, a shopvac will most certainly kill any you suck up. From what ive seen only about 2 in 10 youtube videos are by somebody that actually knows what they are doing.
 

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Don't let the posts above dissuade you. My first cut out, I made a bee vac, sucked up all the bees. Rubber banded the comb in frames and that colony is exploding in my back yard as I type. Take your time and go for it. It's not rocket science

I made a bee vac like this. So I could lift the hive straight onto the bottom board. If it's a small colony, you may need to modify with a divider in advance. I had a divider in mine and slid the lid over and placed the rubber banded brood in frames beside the bees in the hive body. Hour and a half drive home in my truck with ac on, no issues at all. I removed the divider when I set it in place as it was a lot more bees than I estimated. Filled out 8 frames easy. That's the hardest part, IMO for a newbie. Determining size of colony.

I started around 730 am. Hung around for a few minutes after I was complete and sucked up the straggler foragers. Probably didn't leave more than a few hundred bees.

 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Lots of questions to answer. I built a bee vac out of the bucket head shop vac. I used it on two swarms and even sucked up the queen and they’re doing great. The site I honestly haven’t seen. I talked to the homeowner and he says they’re remodeling and the bees keep coming back every year. Apparently they have had other people remove them too. He said after remodeling the nest site will be enclosed. I have a guy I can bounce questions off locally that has done a couple removals. I figured since we can hack and destroy whatever on the house it’d be a good candidate for a beginning removal.
 

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Survivor stock & Buckfast in Langstroth 8F’s
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Just make sure you have the equipment needed, knowledge of local and state laws. I would agree it sounds like a very good first cut out, and we all start some where. I would encourage you to try to take a second pair of hands with you, as it really can help depending on location. Hope it all works out. Best wishes
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Now you are thinking!
Hope all goes better than planned.

One small tip for this time of year to do a cut out.........Not sure what is going on in your area but we are in a dearth and the bees go wild just opening up a hive because they can smell the open nectar in the cells. Take a couple of clean 5 gallon buckets WITH lids that fit tight and put all scrap combs and honey combs in them, keep the lids on them. Doing a cut out that turns into a robbing frenzy is not fun at all!! If you think you are cutting out a hot hive just wait till they are being robbed out also, and you really can't quit in the middle of it or all will be lost.

I can just see it now, the old house will look like it is on fire with all of the smoke LOL.
Well you can laugh at me too, got one to do tomorrow also.
 
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