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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Continuing my anti-pest control options & ran into a number of archived (old) articles on this subject. A search reveals nothing current at all re its effectiveness or failure of such. Some notables currently responding on this site were contributors to these archived posts & threads.

Is there any current studies or opinions that we should be aware of?
 

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opinion:
I tried Thymol in FGMO fogging through the summer the mite counts climbed in the fall and continued to climb until I used Apiguard. FGMO did not work for me.
I also went to the trouble of making the thymol cords and only used them once and decided it was not what I wanted to use. They have a very strong thymol smell and at the time I felt the bees used smell to communicate so the end of the cords. The cords with fogging may work, it was just not for me.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Well taken - thanks. It appears in the archives as such a rage, but as I said, there is nothing to be found that has been recently posted.
 

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I have used FGMO FOG for several years and it WORKS for me as for studies it takes money to get some one to do a study.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Apparently, 'monies' were found in the past for some studies on the subject (see quote below), but I was hoping for something or experience a little more current.

I include this from the Bee-L list because I think you should read it, not because i endorse it. I am and will continue to use FGMO.

Dickm

From: "Bob Harrison" <[email protected]>
To: <[email protected]>
Subject: Re: [BEE-L] Varroa Control ( mineral oil treatment)
Date: Monday, June 16, 2003 1:23 AM

Hello Tom & All,
Would I be correct in saying that if America had to face varroa again with
the benefit of hindsight that America would not have used chemicals so
liberally?

I do not think one could say we ever used chemicals liberally. We started
with amatraz and then those strips were pulled because of some dead hives in
Florida (owned by a friend of mine which still says the strips were the
reason the hives died around 150 hives I believe).

We used fluvalinate (Apistan) then a relative safe and effective control
for varroa which is still in use in areas.

Those which had fluvalinate resistant varroa had little choice but to use
the checkmite strips which were very effective.

The battle to control varroa is on going and will get harder when the
checkmite strips quit working in our area.

Published results of 1998 mineral oil testing in Missouri

I realize you have been a advocate of mineral oil but we ruled out mineral
oil in 1999 after tests run in Missouri in the year 1998 under a grant by
the Missouri department of Agriculture (S.A.R.E. program) using Dr. Pedro P.
Rodriguez method had a complete failure.

I do not think the results are available on line but are published in the
1998-2000 "Missouri Sustainable Agriculture Demonstration Award Projects "
book available from the Missouri Department of Agriculture.

Heading up the project was a beekeeper/entomologist with two master
beekeeper certifications (Matt Higdon),with help from the president of the
Missouri State beekeepers ( Art Gelder) and Ray Nabors (a respected
beekeeper which teaches beekeeping classes).

Not room for me to put all details of the project in this post but will
quote from Matt Higdon from page 24 of the above book:

Though the results are disappointing , Higdon points out," The real value
of the test is to illustrate that one must be skeptical of the many
anecdotal reports and unsubstantiated observations that abound on the
internet-no matter how well intentioned they may be"

Instructions were gleaned from to quote from pg. 22 of the above book:

"Much of this project is a follow-up to the recent work of a "Dr. Pedro
P.Rodriguez', presumably a retired veterinarian in Virginia"

I believe both Matt & Dr. Rodriguez are members of BEE-L so maybe they will
comment.

Bob

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it works for me in the fogger. i doesnt have any comb residue. it will knock the mite numbers down but not get rid of them all together.
 

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I used it for a while and counted mites. I compared fogged hives and unfogged hives.

I used a 5% thymol solution in canola oil, boosting the oil with 1% eucaluptus, 1% tea tree, 1% patchouli and 1% wintergreen. If memory serves me right, that's 1.5 ounces by weight of thymol crystals, and 2 tsps of each oil per quart of canola oil.

It worked for me, but it needed to be reapplied every seven to ten days to be effective. As I added more hives, I kept running out of time. With the addition of formic acid to my arsenal, the formic as easier and less time-consuming.

I think the reason it dropped off the radar was due to the absence of Dr. Rodriguez. I conversed with him several times and he did not approve of my methods as they were a little different than his. But that's a story for another day.

When he left, the controvery subsided. A lot of people commented that fogging anything, even regular smoke from a smoker, will dislodge mites. I never bothered with the cords.

Grant
Jackson, MO
 
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