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I’m working my way through my supply to sell, I came across a couple of half-filled 5 gallon buckets that smell funky. It’s crystallized on the bottom and there’s an inch or two of watery honey. I have a coworker who makes fermented beverages, and I was considering selling these two buckets to him for mead. Anyone know what the going rate is for funky honey?
 

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If your not.making lead yourself, and it's not sellable... I'd give it to a friend. Mabye get some of the mead in return. In my area, theres not really a market for it. There may be in your area. Good luck !!! 😊
 

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Don't know if there's ever going to be much of a market for it, but some people believe that eating small amounts of fermented foods daily is good for your digestive health. In my effort to get all the sourwood and other light colored honey I could one year I scraped the uncapped areas to the mid section before extracting. I put that all in one jar. It fermented and I ate it all 1 to 2 spoonfuls at a time, after stirring, until it was gone. Could not tell any difference in the way I felt though.
 

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You can also try to make your own mead--maybe with your friend's help. It is super simple. You don't even need to remove the honey from the pail...just add bottled or filtered water and maybe a little wine yeast. 3 parts water to 1 part honey and mix well. I made my first 3 gallon batch last fall from some honey that I didn't particularly like and didn't want to sell. I ended up with 12 bottles and think it is delicious. Started 5 more gallons last month.
 

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I have a bunch of frames in a Rubbermaid tote that are full of honey and it smells like they're fermenting. I would love to be able to donate them to someone.
 

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I heat the honey must to kill native yeasts, then add the preferred yeast for the recipe as the temperature cools into the proper range for that yeast. It goes in to a sterilized carboy full of CO2 and bubbles like crazy for a week, at which time I plug it with an airlock.

5 good rackings later, and a 6-year rest in the cave on the North side of the hill, it sells for $27.50 per bottle. Now that is some FUNKY honey!

BTW, get a bottle capper for in-the-bottle aging, then change out to a cork before selling so the customer can enjoy the cork experience. This can greatly reduce the "angel's share" - mead that does not make it to final sale.

ALSO - join a local home brewing club. Los Angeles has the country's oldest and arguably the best home brewing club in the New World - the "Maltose Falcons". Those guys can get you started right from the get-go. Bring your pail and leave your "expertise" at home - go there to learn from guys who have been doing this a while. You'll likely enjoy them a lot. Bottoms up!
 

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Are you saying that you use fermenting honey to make your mead, Charlie?

Most recipes that I've seen call for using fine quality honey, fwiw. For that reason I have never considered using honey that's slightly off....which it will get it stored long enough in my climate. Maybe I've been missing the boat on that one.:scratch:

Martinelli's cider bottles can be capped, and sell filled for less than the price of new wine bottles.

Corking? Fine if you can get $27 a bottle, but otherwise is not what most brewers I know do anymore.
 
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