Beesource Beekeeping Forums banner

1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
102 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Feel like there may be another 2-3 weeks till we get our maple bloom here in Northeast Ohio. Just want to make sure I am doing all I can for my bees. In past winters my bees have done well but this year I noticed some die-off from one hive and another that was surprisingly light on bees. I have read you can easily lose a weak hive this time of the year and I don't want that to happen if I can avoid it.

All hives have the following:

1 deep of honey (top box) 60-80% remaining
Candy board 60-90% remaining with top entrance
Quilt box with dry shavings and ventilation holes
2in foam board insulation wrap
1lb pollen patty placed March 3rd

Do I just wait it out at this point or is there anything else I can do, especially for the hives that look on the weak side? Weather is supposed to turn warm next week but could be rain on the way along with it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,086 Posts
That is very similar to where my girls are at . You are doing it perfectly. Now you have to hope that your spring/summer/fall and early winter mite treatments left your winter bees with sufficient fat stores and Vittelogenin to see out the next 6 weeks or so.
 

·
Registered
Small Cell Nucs
Joined
·
333 Posts
Feel like there may be another 2-3 weeks till we get our maple bloom here in Northeast Ohio. Just want to make sure I am doing all I can for my bees. In past winters my bees have done well but this year I noticed some die-off from one hive and another that was surprisingly light on bees. I have read you can easily lose a weak hive this time of the year and I don't want that to happen if I can avoid it.

All hives have the following:

1 deep of honey (top box) 60-80% remaining
Candy board 60-90% remaining with top entrance
Quilt box with dry shavings and ventilation holes
2in foam board insulation wrap
1lb pollen patty placed March 3rd

Do I just wait it out at this point or is there anything else I can do, especially for the hives that look on the weak side? Weather is supposed to turn warm next week but could be rain on the way along with it.
Do you have an O.A. vaporizer? If she hasnt laid too much brood yet, this is a good time to get a good kill on varroa.
It's a hot topic right now with the EPA approving treatment with supers . You want workers to all be inside the hive but not in cluster. But dont take my word on the not in cluster part. Someone else may have a better insight on that.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,546 Posts
It is pretty common here to install Apivar strips as soon as we can get into the hives. One strip per five frames of bees.

The Apivar knocks back the few mites that remain in the spring and can get us to late summer or late fall. Formic is common in late summer. I personally do an OAV and install a sticky board for three days to get a read on the mites. I usually follow up with 2-3 OAVs 3-4 days apart. I think this is much more effective than a weekly OAV. I have done that and my view is that one is just controlling the mites to current infestation level. There is enough brooding going on to keep the mites reproducing!

And then one or two late October OAVs when there is little brood.

I have some concern about continual OAVs. Jerry Hayes points out that the workers are constantly being replaced but the queen gets the OAV repeatedly until she is replaced/superceded. My thoughts!
 

·
Super Moderator
Aylett, VA 10-frame double deep Langstroth
Joined
·
6,888 Posts
Apivar doesn't work any longer, the mites are resistant.
There are reports of localized areas where Apivar (amitraz) does not seem to be as effective as it once was, but it still works for most. Coumaphos and fluvalinate are no longer recommended for mite control due to resistance.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Struttinbuck

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,558 Posts
It is pretty common here to install Apivar strips as soon as we can get into the hives. One strip per five frames of bees.

The Apivar knocks back the few mites that remain in the spring and can get us to late summer or late fall. Formic is common in late summer. I personally do an OAV and install a sticky board for three days to get a read on the mites. I usually follow up with 2-3 OAVs 3-4 days apart. I think this is much more effective than a weekly OAV. I have done that and my view is that one is just controlling the mites to current infestation level. There is enough brooding going on to keep the mites reproducing!

And then one or two late October OAVs when there is little brood.

I have some concern about continual OAVs. Jerry Hayes points out that the workers are constantly being replaced but the queen gets the OAV repeatedly until she is replaced/superceded. My thoughts!
Is that definitely vaporization? I have heard that caution applied to bees subject to multiple dribble or spray apps. No experience with the wet sugar treatments but I have had no apparent problems with multiple OAV's at short interval reps.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,546 Posts
Definitely vaporization.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,546 Posts
Go to 1:00:30 in link below. Go to post #2 and use the http link.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,558 Posts
He says or admits that Oxalic Acid is a sore spot for him. He makes analagical case about the damage it might do. Like comparing how it can damage human skin or eyes but misses that bees chitin is dry and so is the surface of their eyes. Little things like that but no data about actual queen losses or documented supercedures vis a vis other treatments. No that is not science in my opinion.
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top