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I am in Maryland, and we only get one nectar flow which has been over for 6 weeks or more. I started feeding 1:1 after I pulled supers, and I have always thought it kept them from being too grumpy. My hives are all boiling with bees, and almost running out of room. it seems i may have given them the wrong idea with feeding too much. ( At least the SHB don't stand a chance.) So, i decided to not feed for the remainder of August.

I will go back in the hives the first week of Sept to remove Apivar strips and access their needs then.

Should I have not started feeding at all during the dearth? and then started in Sept?

Every year is a learning year!

Thanks,
NewBeeLady, but not that new anymore.
 

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if you want to keep the pissy foragers busy during the day then open feed VERY light syrup. this keeps them busy. if there are other bees in the neighborhood that you dont want to feed then use an inverted jar on top of inner cover but only one hole in the lid to choke it down.
 

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In general, my area is in a dearth every year from July 1 until winter comes. We do get a bit of a flow when ivy blooms but it is not enough to get them ready for winter. The rains stop in the summer and everything turns brown. If I don't feed the bees, hives start dying from starvation. I try to feed about a quart of 1:1 every 2-3 days. It is enough to keep the hive alive and well but little enough to get the queen to slow down the rate of egg laying. I also open feed pollen powder (Ultrabee) since we generally have a total lack of pollen too. From my point of view, not feeding in a long dearth causes way more problems than feeding. FYI, do not over feed either. Weak starving hives are sickly, die easily, get robbed constantly and become the mite bomb for the neighborhood. Mites and diseases have a much easier time with a sickly hive. When you finally start feeding these sickly hives to get them ready for winter, they rarely take and store enough food to make it through the winter and die before spring comes. My recommendation is to feed less often but closely monitor how much food is stored in the hive. If they start running low on stores, feed more often and in larger quantities.
 
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