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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Why do beeks feed splits if there is a flow on? Drove by a commercial bee yard and saw all the splits being fed.
 

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Aylett, VA 10-frame double deep Langstroth
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I feed all my splits because they stay in the same yard. All the foragers fly back to their original hive leaving nothing but nurse bees in the split. Also, a split usually has several undrawn frames. I want the newly emerged brood to draw the frames out for me. Feed helps.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I feed all my splits because they stay in the same yard. All the foragers fly back to their original hive leaving nothing but nurse bees in the split. Also, a split usually has several undrawn frames. I want the newly emerged brood to draw the frames out for me. Feed helps.
So its ok to leave splits in the same yard? I am kind of limited on were i can put my splits and was curious about that.
 

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Aylett, VA 10-frame double deep Langstroth
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Sure, just make sure you are putting more bees in the split than you think you need. Even the brood frames you pull will have foragers on them so expect an exodus of bees after an hour or so, continuing for a day or two. Then, what you have left will be nurse bees that need to be fed. Use a robber screen from day one as there won't be any guard bees either and the nuc could get robbed out in a heartbeat.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Ok thanks JW going to be attempting splits on wednesday. To try and prevent swarming and i want more bee's. I dont have mated queens available so should i let the parent colonie make a new queen and transfer the old one to the split?
 

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Aylett, VA 10-frame double deep Langstroth
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Yes, make it a fly back split. So, put the split with the old queen in a 10 frame box with two frames of drawn comb and capped brood. Fill the rest of the box with foundation and place it where the hive is currently. Move the existing hive, now queenless, to the new location. All the foragers will return to the split and the old colony will make a new queen. Actually, they will make a bunch. Once the cells are capped, you can move a frame with a cell or two and some more bees into yet another split into a nuc. This will help to reduce the possibility of what the bees will think is an after swarm.

Not sure if your flow has started up there yet. If not, feed both colonies.
 

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In the days before varroa Tom Seeley tracked the nests of a number of feral swarms…obviously nest building using naturally available nectar only. By the following spring less than 25% survived. Nest building and provisioning is a Herculean task.
Building comb requires a massive amount of carbohydrates. Although splits and swarms are different, I can’t think of a single reason not to supplement that when they are trying to get their nest built.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Yes, make it a fly back split. So, put the split with the old queen in a 10 frame box with two frames of drawn comb and capped brood. Fill the rest of the box with foundation and place it where the hive is currently. Move the existing hive, now queenless, to the new location. All the foragers will return to the split and the old colony will make a new queen. Actually, they will make a bunch. Once the cells are capped, you can move a frame with a cell or two and some more bees into yet another split into a nuc. This will help to reduce the possibility of what the bees will think is an after swarm.

Not sure if your flow has started up there yet. If not, feed both colonies.
This sounds great I could have a mated queen next Wednesday. should I do the flyback split and then introduce a mated queen in there next week?
 
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