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I started from a nuc two weeks ago. I was told to feed them until there is nectar flow.(They will stop taking it) I fed them for the last two weeks. They drew out about 7 or 8 frames last week so I added the super. This week I went in and there was a pretty good deal of capped honey in the lower chamber. (All the sugar water from last week was gone (2.5 gallons). The super had some bees but not a lot of brood. I decided to REMOVE the feeder. I'm concerned that I took the sugar water away too soon as it is a nuc and needs to build up. We are in North/Central Jersey.
 

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If in doubt give em some more.. if they dont want it they wont take it down....
 

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Bees will take the syrup and turn to honey for the purpose of rearing brood. They will only produce brood when the number of bees that are in the hive can cover them and effectively keep them warm and tend to them. If the lower brood chamber has plenty of stores now, wait a while for feeding. give them a week and check again to see where they are at with brood rearing. Populations can explode quickly so keep an eye open for them needing feed later.
 

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Watch them coming back to the hive and see what amount of pollen they are bringing in. If they are pulling in large amounts of pollen and bee are coming back heavily loaded (they will often miss the landing board and crash into the grass in front of the hive, or land half way down the board and rest a bit before crawling in if they are carrying lots of nectar) you don't need to feed.

You should be in your spring flow by now, so feeding is optional. Later this summer, when there isn't much nectar or pollen available, you may need to start feeding again to get them into shape for winter. Italians are known to raise brood longer in a dearth than other bees, and can eat their winter stores up in August and September when the queen should have shut down already, so you may need to feed them up for winter, too.

Peter
 

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fwiw, i did the same as you. i fed them gallons. they kept stuffing it away in the comb. i got concerned about them being syrup-bound, without enough open comb for the queen to lay. so i took their feed away. so far so good. they've got brood, capped and uncapped. they still have a couple combs of syrup left. i'll keep an eye on those syrup combs and give them more syrup if it seem to start disappearing. e.g. summer dearth.
 
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