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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have some honey not yet bottled, that crystallized in the bucket, which I would not mind feeding back to the bees. I am wondering HOW people feed honey to bees in winter. The only comment I’ve seen in the threads on this topic was from someone who said they just pour it over the top bars. Are there other methods you have used?

(Situation with weather is that low temps are averaging around low 20s, high temps upper 30s...it’s a warm spike now, though: today, tomorrow and next day the temps will peak around 50 degrees. Within a week we will be down in the teens.)
 

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Whatever you do........DO NOT just pour it over them or the top bars. it will drip on the cluster and they will get cold. worst case it gets on the queen and she drowns. you can put a tray of some sort that will allow them to walk up and get to the honey. something low and with holes for them to get up to it without going to the edges. i don't know of any commercial thing. I was thinking i would love to get a 3d printer to print frames with little trays like this so if they don't take enough syrup or i don't get enough of a fall flow i can just pour honey into the frames and have it not drip.
 

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Look for the lid of a plastic deli container (the round ones in the olive bar at a grocery store are the ones I am thinking of.) Fill the top surface of the lid with honey. That's shallow enough to prevent bees from drowning, and maybe short enough that you could place it on top of the frames and under an inner cover without needing a feeding shim. Make one and slip it in and see what happens. And let us know, because I am always interested in ways to feed bees.

Nancy
 

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I put it in a disposable sandwich container last year and put the container on the top bars. I'm sure some drown, but the next time I got in the container was completely clean and my bees were alive.
 

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The "Bull of the Woods" would say "Sure, feed your honey back, that way all of your hives have the same diseases". Sugar is a much better choice if you did not do your due diligence and get them feed up in the fall.

Crazy Roland
 

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My question is... Why do you want to feed it back because it crystallized? Maybe I am reading you wrong, but that doesn't make the honey 'bad'. I agree with Roland and would go with sugar and keep the honey.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
RE: “Why do you want to feed it back because it crystallized? Maybe I am reading you wrong, but that doesn't make the honey 'bad'.”


Thanks for the reply. I didn’t intend to imply that there’s anything wrong with the honey. I only mentioned it was crystallized beacause my question was about the best way to feed it to bees, and whether it’s currently liquid or solid seemed relevant in terms of method.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
That was my concern, kaizen. Even though it may be cold (honey may be solid) now... if it warms up and they haven’t taken it yet, it could ‘melt’ all over them. Interesting idea with the 3D printing thought.
 
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