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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
No, I have not tried this myself.
No, they did not have diarrhea.
Yes, it is probably better to try this when bees are flying and there is some forage.
Yes, the bees survived and seemed to benefit from this pollen substitute (per the video).
No, they did not store any of the banana; nothing was thrown away either - they consumed it.

Here you go (audio in Spanish; titles in Russian).
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TfbEEnm8ZNE
 

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When I put my piece of banana in a hive with chalk brood having been told it was a cure, my hand turned gray with stinging bees and I wanted so much to hit in the face the comedian who recommended the course of action.

Anyone trying this be aware that banana and the bees alarm pheromone are close enough to the same that the bees can instantly go on attack mode. Have no idea if it works, just know I won't be trying it again.
 

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First, I've tried to promote attack with banana. They didn't. Maybe your experience was from something different?

Feeding banana is popular in Latin America. Maybe anywhere bananas grow. I've been told you want bananas that are very ripe. Some claim increased brood production. My good friend Aurelio P says no. Bananas are carbohydrates.
 

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First, I've tried to promote attack with banana. They didn't. Maybe your experience was from something different?
Maybe you didn't wave the banana peel in front of the entrance long enough. :eek:

Alex
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Last year I watched first hand bees digging through my rotting peaches.
Like vultures (there was some mid-summer dearth).
The well ripe bananas not much different from peaches at that - just another rotting fruit (best if they can poop outside - not a great winter food).

Two weeks ago the bees jumped me for NOT using smoke.
All I did was trying to give some dry sugar.
Well, once I smoked the sugar, bees left me alone.
Smoke the darn banana!
:)
 

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Interesting topic.

Bees are opportunistic creatures and will gather/feed what is readily available to them, sometimes really disgusting stuff (cat litter comes to mind, for the minerals?).

Rotting fruit (when sugars are most accessible) often has bees feeding on it, especially during dearth/ late Fall when preferred resources are low and rotting fruit may be plentiful.

Our chickens LOVE bananas so I don't think our bees ever get a chance, but one never knows, I'll be watching closer from now on. :)
 
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