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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Lots of people ask me how to feed drugs. This is how we do it.
Beekeepers know what Im talking about - this is how we keep the bees healthy and prevent against AFB and EFB and other infectious viruses and bacteria from harming the Queen or otherwise damaging brood inside the hive.
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Mixing up a 400 gram pack of Oxysol 62.5 with 3.5 lbs of white cane sugar
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Unpacking the hives on April 10th, a warm sunny day in spring - first visit to beehives in 2012. There was 12.5% death rate this year, down from 25% last year.
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The antibiotic sugar powder is dusted across the tops of the brood chamber frames. 38 grams per hive split over 3 / 4 visits in two months.
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For more information, please have a gander at my last blog post, where I describe in some detail how and why we go about feeding antibiotics to honey bees in Ontario Canada first thing in the spring, no later than the June 1st.
 

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If I had to feed antibiotics 3 times in spring I would give it all a miss - sorry.
 

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If I had to feed antibiotics 3 times in spring I would give it all a miss - sorry.
Haha well i wish we didn't have to do it, but the diseases and parasites make that our reality. We're not done with the precautions yet - we still have to put in sticky strips and acid pads

Max I checked out your website . Nice digs in Australia . Are you telling me that you have no honeybee diseases down there?

Here in Canada, we have a large fruit growing region near the border with United States in Niagara Falls Ontario and this used to be and probably still is a hotbed of honeybee diseases and parasitic infestation because of a) increased density of region honey bee populations b) tourism, and the importation of fruit, flowers, insects and even honey from America and c) most importantly, neglect - the fruit growers, bless their hearts, are not entirely committed to beekeeping and simply maintain apiaries for the purposes of pollinating the trees. Unfortunately this attitude allows the sick hives to go untended and get robbed out by the stronger hives in the region, spreading the virus or bacteria or mites and other parasites along the way. In 1992 there was a team of beekeepers sent by the OMAF Ontario Ministry of Agriculture and Food to seek and destroy all beehives infected with American Foulbrood. I was part of the team. We burned hundreds of beehives in a gravel pit near Pinbrook.

I will post more when we 'put in the sticky strips' to catch mites - veroa and tracheal mites

but more than likely you must feed some antibiotics in Australia? or is prayer all that's required down under?
 

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Hi Arob,

I'm not a commercial beekeeper, just a small backyarder producing maybe 2000 kg of honey a year.
We don't have Varroa ( yet!) but AFB is around. Antibiotics are not permitted, we have to burn and we do.
We have SHB and use traps with DE. No chemicals in my bees or most beeks around here, definitely no antibiotics - I don't think you could buy them legally.
A small operation like mine can get away with good hygiene and constant vigilance. We have no winter to speak of, our bees are out all the time. We never feed and may expect a flow any time of the year.
I also grow Pecans and some fruit. Again, it is all organic. Next door is a dairy farm and a cattle property - no chemicals are sprayed.
It seems like your operation is surounded by irresponsible farmers and it must difficult ( and expensive) to keep bees under such circumstances.
All the best
 

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Hi Arob,

I had a look at your website. Very interesting and entertaining. Lovely photos. I remember the cold and frosty morning from Switzerland where I grew up.
We have some Angus here too.
Your set-up to make beeboxes looks impressive. How many hives have you?
Hope you are having a lovely spring. Autumn here but the bees are still busy.
 
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