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If you have followed the Bee Attacking Neighborhood thread you know that the solution was to feed the hives with 1:1 to calm their a$$es down. I can actually open the hives now and swish the bees away from the feeder with none of them interested in me. Before, it was attack city.

So with them taking down (possibly gallons) of 1:1 into the main hive, should I be worried when the main nectar flow turns on and I start putting honey supers on? Will they relocate it up stairs if they need brood space downstairs?

Secondary question, are they dehydrating this 1:1 right now and storing it or using it for brood, or are consuming it as it is?

TIA
Mike
 

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If you have followed the Bee Attacking Neighborhood thread you know that the solution was to feed the hives with 1:1 to calm their a$$es down. I can actually open the hives now and swish the bees away from the feeder with none of them interested in me. Before, it was attack city.

So with them taking down (possibly gallons) of 1:1 into the main hive, should I be worried when the main nectar flow turns on and I start putting honey supers on? Will they relocate it up stairs if they need brood space downstairs?

Secondary question, are they dehydrating this 1:1 right now and storing it or using it for brood, or are consuming it as it is?

TIA
Mike
yes
they will consume
they will store what is left
if they need space they could move some.

trim the feed to not have too much gain in stored, capped feed, as well when the flow starts they could be honey bound then swarm.
could shift to 2:1 to see if that also works to keep them calm, or 3:1

GG
 

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I am in a similar situation - put a super on 2 weeks ago when it looked like the flow is coming, now with this cold snap (below freezing for few days/nights), I have to feed them. I tried taking super off one of the hives and it was a disaster- way too many bees by now, too overcrowded and no food, so I put the super back and decided to feed liquid honey (2:1) instead of syrup. I have lots of crystallized honey from last year that I don't like and this will be a good opportunity to "recycle" it. That way whatever they don't eat and store in the supers will not "contaminate" the honey when the flow starts (hopefully).
 

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This is what I don't get. Putting supers on while feeding is a definite no-no. Putting supers on after feeding is okay because the general theory is they won't move syrup. But then others say bees will move syrup/ nectar. Obviously the bees don't know what are supers and what aren't, so what's the real answer? Do bees move syrup/nectar/honey or do they not? If they do then we're all in denial that none of that is moved to supers. I've seen several here say they don't move it, and several that they do.

edit: this obviously doesn't apply to those feeding honey
 

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My understanding is that during regular flow nectar is moved multiple times from frame to frame and even spread up between supers. I have witnessed it first hand one time in summer when I had almost full super (but not capped yet) and added another super on top, then checked few days later and they both were half full- they have spread the nectar from the first super to the second for larger area and faster drying/curing. I don't know if the same applies to immediate food during dearth or no-fly days like now.
 

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jimbo,
IMO when the brood nest is expanded, the honey ,nectar or what ever is moved out to make room for brood.
If you want to test, add red or blue food coloring to your feed, not a huge cost. Give it a spin, if you have some colored honey then you have your answer.
Also if you brood box swap then more honey is moved than if you do not. I am confident if you box swap and add a super of comb then some of the honey from the brood nest ends up in the super.
As well there is the math of it, 2-5 % is not that big of a deal, but we have seen where some "feed until the super is full"

IMO not a big issue unless you are feeding heavy AND selling honey. A little sugar in my honey is tolerated for self use. If you feed a barrel of feed to 20 hives then extract, and sell, then you may have an issue.

Bottom line to feed and assume all of it never gets to a super is a reach , unless you are raising NUCs or something and do not super.

GG
 

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jimbo,
IMO when the brood nest is expanded, the honey ,nectar or what ever is moved out to make room for brood.
If you want to test, add red or blue food coloring to your feed, not a huge cost. Give it a spin, if you have some colored honey then you have your answer.
Also if you brood box swap then more honey is moved than if you do not. I am confident if you box swap and add a super of comb then some of the honey from the brood nest ends up in the super.
As well there is the math of it, 2-5 % is not that big of a deal, but we have seen where some "feed until the super is full"

IMO not a big issue unless you are feeding heavy AND selling honey. A little sugar in my honey is tolerated for self use. If you feed a barrel of feed to 20 hives then extract, and sell, then you may have an issue.

Bottom line to feed and assume all of it never gets to a super is a reach , unless you are raising NUCs or something and do not super.

GG
Thanks for the reply. This is opposite of some people's opinion on here that bees don't move honey (nectar, syrup, whatever). I'm assuming there have been experiments with this.
 

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I don't feed much, but my experience is sometimes. Lol.

More often than not, a brood nest will "grow" into honey/syrup stored in comb and new nectar will be stored in supers, or comb will be drawn somewhere using it. If you're the kind of keep that puts a gallon or 2 of syrup on one day, notice it's gone the next, but see white wax and put supers back on, it's likely that it's getting moved up.

It's rare that they move capped stores, but it can/does happen.
 

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Just curious, if you ever feed sugar syrup at all, can you ever be certain that it doesn't make its way into the honey? Thoughts of the French M&M thing, and the Red Stingers in NY come to mind.
 

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Just curious, if you ever feed sugar syrup at all, can you ever be certain that it doesn't make its way into the honey? Thoughts of the French M&M thing, and the Red Stingers in NY come to mind.
If you feed syrup at the end of season, then chances are very slim that any drop of it will ever survive till the flow, especially in a single deep overwintering setup... Feeding in spring may have to be rationed more to make sure there isn't too much left over by the first flow. I'm not taking chances, feeding only honey to main colonies and syrup to nucs only. It works fine in my hobby setup, but does not scale well, probably commercial beekeepers are not that scrupulous...
 

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I don't feed much, but my experience is sometimes. Lol.

More often than not, a brood nest will "grow" into honey/syrup stored in comb and new nectar will be stored in supers, or comb will be drawn somewhere using it. If you're the kind of keep that puts a gallon or 2 of syrup on one day, notice it's gone the next, but see white wax and put supers back on, it's likely that it's getting moved up.

It's rare that they move capped stores, but it can/does happen.
What about the somewhat common practice of swapping brood boxes, the honey dome is in the middle, and removed, some will go into the top brood box, if there are supers some goes up. I often put full frames from dead outs into the bottom brood box, scratch them up a bit and let the bees move the honey out to reuse the comb. Timed in a dearth they would consume it. In a flow they re store it.

GG
 

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Yes gg, that's why I used terms like rare, sometime, and more often than not.

Honey contamination would also happen if you shook the bees down into the bottom box and placed an excluder between them, thereby making said box a super, which is also a common practice.

Obviously any manipulation can vary the outcomes, which is why my comments did not address any of the 10 million ways that stuff we do could influence the outcome. I agree that the specific manipulation you are talking about could and probably does cause feed to be moved. But the original post did not lead me to believe that there would be any manipulation leading up to the adding of the supers.

So imo, the syrup will likely not be moved into the supers in a quantity that affects the honey any more than the bees finding soda cans strewn along the highway.
 

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Yes gg, that's why I used terms like rare, sometime, and more often than not.

Honey contamination would also happen if you shook the bees down into the bottom box and placed an excluder between them, thereby making said box a super, which is also a common practice.

Obviously any manipulation can vary the outcomes, which is why my comments did not address any of the 10 million ways that stuff we do could influence the outcome. I agree that the specific manipulation you are talking about could and probably does cause feed to be moved. But the original post did not lead me to believe that there would be any manipulation leading up to the adding of the supers.

So imo, the syrup will likely not be moved into the supers in a quantity that affects the honey any more than the bees finding soda cans strewn along the highway.
not likely ,, concur
never/impossible,, disagree
shades of gray.....

GG
 
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