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Enforcement is always the question. Even when it is blatantly obvious like the mentioned boom in production by China's neighbors. That's because the US banned Chinese honey years ago, so China just launders it through a neighbor.

As for the labeling, I noticed this a while back on some. I was eating lunch at a fast food joint and put some "honey sauce" on my biscuit. I noticed the taste was off so I looked at the label. Sure enough, cut with corn syrup. So the only labeling was "sauce" instead of just being labeled honey. Most consumers won't notice things like this.

Another example is chicken eggs. Labeled as "cage free" the average consumer associates "free range" and is willing to pay more. Brown eggs by most are automatically associated as more natural than white eggs and automatically demand a premium, even though they may still be produced by caged birds. But I digress.

I agree, people must buy local! Obviously as a beekeeper I would say this. But I always advise my clients of the same risks in buying "cheap" honey. The best ever is the label that says "how do you know it's honey if you don't know the beekeeper?" Another favorite is "real food doesn't have ingredients, it IS ingredients." It's a shame that our food chain has become so complicated with "fake" food. I'm lucky to have a well educated clientele that's willing to pay a little extra, knowing they're getting the real product.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
As for the labeling, I noticed this a while back on some. I was eating lunch at a fast food joint and put some "honey sauce" on my biscuit. I noticed the taste was off so I looked at the label. Sure enough, cut with corn syrup. So the only labeling was "sauce" instead of just being labeled honey. Most consumers won't notice things like this.
Were you perhaps dining at KFC?

Anyway the “honey sauce” label is a pretty good example of the intent of the rule. Would you rather have them label the product as “honey”?
 

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As for the labeling, I noticed this a while back on some. I was eating lunch at a fast food joint and put some "honey sauce" on my biscuit. I noticed the taste was off so I looked at the label. Sure enough, cut with corn syrup. So the only labeling was "sauce" instead of just being labeled honey. Most consumers won't notice things like this.
Really? The next thing you are going to tell me is that spaghetti sauce isn't made from spaghetti and pizza sauce isn't made from pizzas. Are you saying that you though something labeled honey sauce was honey and not blended w/ something else? I know that cranberry sauce isn't the same thing as cranberries. Don't you and everybody else?
 

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Haha, not KFC but close. Popeyes Chicken!

No, I'd prefer they don't label it as honey at all. But since it does contain some honey they are allowed to. Maybe label it "honey flavored sauce". But now the real troubling question: what if the honey used for flavoring was imported and already cut once before being packaged here and cut again...? Not saying that happens for sure, but I stand firm, it was a far cry from tasting like honey at all to me!
 

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Putting anything but butter and/or honey on a biscuit is a crime. Popeyes should be shut down!
 

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"Of course, you should be careful about how much honey you consume, even if it is the real deal. As I reported earlier this year, the World Health Organization recommends that adults limit their sugar consumption — including the sugar naturally present in honey, syrups, fruit juices and fruit concentrates (but not whole fruits) — to about 5 percent of their total daily calories (about 6 teaspoons)."



Isn't that an interesting recommendation?

How will enforcement occur? Just like it has already. Someone gets caught doing something they shouldn't and that's when regulations get enforced. Sampling and testing can make that happen before the product gets to the manufacturer or consumer.

There are cases on the books and in the literature.






 

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This link was provided in Dadent's news letter that came out today and provides a pretty good overview (in plain English) of the FDA rule. Explain to me again, why this is a bad thing? :scratch:

http://www.minnpost.com/second-opin...lend-fdas-new-rules-will-help-answer-question
Sounds goo to me. I am a bit surprised, though, as my understanding was that anything being marketed as honey, that wasnt 100% pure honey, has always been legally required to have the word "blend" in lettering at least as large as the lettering of the word "honey".
On a side note, another interesting tidbit that I have gleaned from the link is that the new gold standard for honesty in honey marketing is that one needs to buy from a "local" beekeeper to be assured of getting pure honey. Its comforting to learn that all "local" beekeepers are honest. ;)
 
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