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Interesting read. I hope it catches on as much as the article leads us to believe...but I suspect that, much like our treatments for varroa, GMO-producing companies will create new pesticides and [new pesticide]-ready crops to go with them. Like beekeepers, some farmers will use them and some won't.
 

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I will not argue the article , but for our farm it's the huge cost of buying hybrid seeds (which is what a lot of RR seeds are) that is making us think twice about growing it. With the depressed commodity prices margins start to get thin. Hybrids still out perform traditional stock no doubt, but if we are working with negative margins then we must cut those costs .
 

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:applause: I am little to say surprised.
 

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“Five years ago the [GMO seeds] worked,” said farmer Christ Huegerich, who along with his father planted GMO seeds. “I didn’t have corn rootworm because of the Bt gene, and I used less pesticide. Now, the worms are adjusting, and the weeds are resistant. Mother Nature adapts.”
Man plans and God laughs (along with Mother Nature)

There is as much talk about resistance as there is about cost effectiveness. Regardless of the reasons GOOD RIDDENCE !!!!!
 

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I am not familiar with "Waking Times" magazine, but it does not appear to be your usual AG mag. In the mag. are articles about the Soul and Physical Body converging through evolution..... hmm. Think I will stick to the Progressive Farmer.
 

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It's all about the bottom line. I'm cringing as quite a few local farms are cutting down windbreaks and tilling slopes they didn't before so they can plant even more.
 

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I don't hear any talk of farmers in my area dropping the Gmo seed. I think they all plan to use it for their corn and beans this year.
 

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There may be some truth to this. Here is something I know for sure. A profile of the American farmer is that he/she is a bright risk taking, profit driven, entrepreneur, who usually carries a pretty heavy debt load. If there is an opportunity seen across the fence it catches on quickly. No articles in magazines are required, word of success spreads like wildfire in farming circles. If one needs to see what's making money right now, one only needs to look at what is being grown.
 

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It always gets me when non farmers make statements like this "Simply put, they say non-GMO crops are more productive and profitable."

They have no idea what they are talking about...
 

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If there is an opportunity seen across the fence it catches on quickly. No articles in magazines are required, word of success spreads like wildfire in farming circles.
I watched a program on TV the other night about feeding America and the way we farm today compared to our grandparents way. Only 2% of the population are farming. The overall feeling one got from watching it was bleak, but near the end several key players admitted that the shift is starting to happen. Less corn feed beef is being consumed forcing that industry to start moving in a new direction. A lot more produce is being grown in city/urban areas that locals are buying, etc. There is a shift starting to take place and eventually how we farm will also have to adjust.
 

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ian post #3 above has a valid point. I am in a marginal corn area, mostly corn for dairy forage. last year a couple of neighbors went back to older hybrids to cut input costs. they trimmed up front costs by something like $85/acre as I recall. their corn looked as good or better than a lot of it in the area. in the past the chemical and seed companies tend to try to go toward pricing their products so they are making most of the money not the grower.
 

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It always gets me when non farmers make statements like this "Simply put, they say non-GMO crops are more productive and profitable."

They have no idea what they are talking about...
Just an hour ago, I asked one of our Corn'Soybean guys what he would think of switching to a Non-GMO variety. He said he did not think that it would be possible to obtain enough seed for a typical commercial planting. And if he was able to, it would mean he could only plant perhaps half of his normal acreage (4k to 6k acres). He also added, before you start to count your profits, don't forget to take into consideration the cost of all that diesel to cultivate those crops and the pesticides that would be required. Those airplanes aren't cheap and besides that you can't leave your hives out there....

Sure... non-GMO will work in the garden, and in subsistence scale farming, but on an industrial farm - no way. There are no more 300 acre farms.... they all farm thousands of acres...
 

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But that pendulum is swinging evermore to the "how food is produced" side.
Maybe. But for the moment it seems to be tied to the economic as well as educational status of the buyer.
 
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