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My mentore had bees last year raise bees after all the rain and cool weather and built two deeps of honey full. I'm debating encouraging my bees to build up and take advantage of a fall flow that might not happen
 

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Encourage your bees? How do you do that?

I know that people like to make predictions about the future, but, why, what's the point? You are only going to get what you get. Or is someone selling Honey Futures?
 

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Not sure if there will be a fall flow in NC this year. I let the bees build what they want to build. Got 2 supers on now, 1st is capped, 2nd they are still drawing comb but very slowly. Depends on a lot of things. You could try planting an acre or half acre of buckwheat for them. Matures in 30 days...
 

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If your area is similar to mine, Fall flows are certainly not to be expected. Some years we will get a decent flow, but this is pretty rare. I wouldn't attempt to artificially build up colonies for such rare occurrences. The best thing you can do is let the bees naturally manage their populations and be prepared to super if necessary.
 

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All flows are local. I noticed tonight that the Wingstem (or yellow crownbeard, depending on were you are from) is about my height in the full sun by my house. No blooms, but this seems a little early to me. Not that I'm complaining. If we get that in a couple weeks we could have a good fall flow, which I would be very thankful for.
 

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All flows are local. I noticed tonight that the Wingstem (or yellow crownbeard, depending on were you are from) is about my height in the full sun by my house. No blooms, but this seems a little early to me. Not that I'm complaining. If we get that in a couple weeks we could have a good fall flow, which I would be very thankful for.
The blooms look similar. My master-gardener wife says to look at the leaves. Some sources say crownbeard is a type of wingstem, but it makes a difference to beeks. Crownbeard is a minor forage source (if I trust the sources I've found), but proper wingstem is a better source. According to my bees, they like both the nectar and the pollen. I believe both are late summer/autumn asters.

http://virginiawildflowers.org/2013/09/01/yellow-crownbeard/

" ... the leaves of crownbeard are opposite, broadly ovate and gently toothed, whereas the leaves of wingstem are alternate, lanceolate (long and narrow), serrate, and very coarse to the touch (like sandpaper)."
 

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Well, I hope it is Wingstem, the stuff is everywhere, and the bees are flying!:D
Just for grins, what is your altitude? Our apiary is at 1800 ft, a bit north of you in the NE panhandle of WV. We're not seeing goldenrod up this high but the wingstem is all over the place.

We've also still got some mountain mint, which the bees thought was dandy until wingstem developed.
 

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I'm at about 1200 feet. Wingstem seems to be the major flow in the fall for me. We have a patch that is several acres a hundred or so yards away. When I get home early enough I like to look over it, it is alive with pollinators.

After it is gone there is some goldenrod, but mostly just asters and some remaining clover. Hard work for little gain.
 

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Oooh, I gotta like what this site has to say, although so far my hive scale is not showing a lot of flow other than what I've feeding them. Perhaps they're bringing it in about as fast as the excess water evaporates off the syrup. We've got patches of this all over the valley our apiary is in, probably 10 acres or more of yellow blooms out of about 50 cleared acres?

http://plants.bees.net/gallery/asteraceae/Photo_Verbesina_alternifolia_2_bees_1611_RT8

"Wingstem may well be one of the underrated honey plants of North America. My experience with the species is that it is very attractive to bees. Pellett[15] states, “It appears to be a very dependable source of nectar and in the neighborhoods where it is plentiful the bees rarely fail to fill their hives for winter and to provide some late surplus.” He then goes on to state that it is quite drought resistant and that it should be planted extensively in waste places. Harvey Lovell[9] states, “Wing stem is often the most important fall honey plant in hilly country in eastern Kentucky and Tennessee”. Pammel and King[13] agree that it is a good honey plant in Iowa, and Ramsay reports that it has a good reputation in Canada."
 
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