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From the previous posts it appears that the gross hive scale weighing, and that which would result from inspecting the number of frames of brood and necessary honey seem to agree. Arrived at by different means but a common net result (y).
Not necessarily.

The real answer is - honey needs are proportional to the hive fuel efficiency; local climate; and to the particular bee cluster needs.

A case in point - how many pounds of honey is needed to winter a little 4/5-frame nuc?
NOT 130#; not even close.
:)
Here are the nucs:
 

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GregV;

I re read my post but I dont see where you get the idea I was suggesting 4 or 5 frame nuc needed the same gross weight as a double deep 10 frame. All the variables mentioned will have an influence on a precise answer. I think a ball park figure is what is being kicked around.

I saw nothing wrong with your method of viewing the number of frames of brood and allotting frames of capped stores accordingly, but I see value in not tearing hive all apart near close up if not necessary.
 

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Discussion Starter · #23 ·
I suppose there is also the factor of how long and warm the fall is. If one stops feeding now because it looks like there is enough stores and the extremely warm conditions continue past the second week in Oct. do we run the risk of the bees eating some of the stores simply because there is no nectar and all our flowers are pretty much spent?
 

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GregV;

I re read my post but I dont see where you get the idea I was suggesting 4 or 5 frame nuc needed the same gross weight as a double deep 10 frame. All the variables mentioned will have an influence on a precise answer. I think a ball park figure is what is being kicked around.

I saw nothing wrong with your method of viewing the number of frames of brood and allotting frames of capped stores accordingly, but I see value in not tearing hive all apart near close up if not necessary.
OK; all good.
I totally agree that in a case of a large standardized setup, just a quick weight check of each stack is the way to go.
Makes no sense whatsoever to be taking apart multi-box setups to check frame by a frame (especially since the weight of empty boxes/covers/lids is very much uniformed).

As soon as you step to the right or the left of the standardised setup - that requires adjustment.
I am only pointing out this to the users who'd just grab the magic # and run with it - with no regard to their own circumstance.
 

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do we run the risk of the bees eating some of the stores
Of course you do - especially if some colonies are still brooding.
Hence need to be checking the status periodically.
 

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Discussion Starter · #26 ·
Thanks Greg, I will keep checking the stores. The nice thing about the long deep hives is that it is like having two langs welded in one frame so to check the 'bottom box' area there is no need to dismantle the hive and cause upset. My one lang double deep set up is more disruptive to the colony as I need to break the propolis and lift off the upper box to check the lower and then everyone is annoyed. With the long deeps I just open the lid, lift off the soft cover and move a frame back, lift it a little to gauge the weight and move on. I can also just move the frame back, look down with a light and see if there is brood or capped honey, nectar is a little harder to judge.
 
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