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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
After watching many videos from Poland, Ukraine and Russia, I decided to make one myself in broken English:

Ep.1 Extreme wintering

My intention is to make an episode every week and see how long they will survive.
I have no opinion on this topic, so I will not be engaged in discussion.

Channels that inspired me to do this experiment are listed on my channel.
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
One week into queen confinement experiment. Checking for emergency queen cells.

Ep.2 Extreme wintering
 

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5 ,8 ,10 frame, and long Lang
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S.B.
was is the purpose of the queen confinement?
What were your goals for this experiment?

GG
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
GG,
Beekeepers from Eastern Europe are using this method for many years. Also Randy Oliver mentions in his video on varroa management that it also used in Italy, but I don't speak Italian, so I don't know.
Videos from those beekeepers, whom I listed on my channel, explain benefits of queen confinement.
First of all it is stopping varroa breeding cycle and preventing mite crash in the fall.
Second, it is preventing winter brood and reducing winter honey consumption.
There are other uses and benefits of caging the queen, but those two are most valuable.
So I decided to make this information available to English speaking audience in my rudimentary English.
I am not aiming to create a discussion about it, just show an experiment and everyone can make their own conclusions.
S.B.
 

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thanks S.B. for your reply.
I try not to make assumptions or presumptions, hence my ask.

GG
 

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In essence, the queen exclusion is timed to create two significant brood-breaks - longer winter brood break and shorter mid-summer brood break.
One can see there are two main clearly defined brooding time-frames - spring brooding (build-up of the spring/summer bee) and fall brooding (build-up of the winter bee).
Most all activities then are planned around these brood-breaks - main flow foraging, mite control, wintering, etc.

Keeping the above in mind, we then can also see that the same effect of the favorably timed brood breaks can be achieved in other ways (including that certain bees just do it naturally in some locations without artificial human intervention - local/feral bees in US Appalachia region, etc).

So speaking of the videos here, I am unsure what is the actual queen exclusion plan presented.
 

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I think many of the people running single deep broods effectively are creating a brood break or at least a bottleneck in brood rearing when they pull supers and put on 4 or 5 gallons of feed. Certainly it would be more to control cluster size than the effect on varroa but that could also be of some consequence.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Ep.3 Extreme wintering.
2 weeks of queen confinement. Robbing prevention, bulk feeding.

 

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Nice looking equipment.
By the way, as a former English teacher, no need to apologize for the quality. Excellent.
 

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S.B. - very nice presentation. Because I know that eastern European system (theoretically - never tried it) will be watching your videos with huge interest.
 

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Why "extreme wintering" though?
Nothing extreme was done just yet. :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Ep.4 Extreme wintering.
3 weeks of queen confinement. Varroa mite treatment with oxalic acid dribble.

 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Why "extreme wintering" though?
Nothing extreme was done just yet. :)
Confining a queen for 6 months is extreme enough by most beekeepers standards.
In fact the name for series came as direct translation from Russian Экстремальная зимовка,
which is the name of a book written by guru of queen confinement Vladimir Malykhin from Ukraine.
Here is very long video illustration for his book, one can fast forward through it and find many interesting moments without understanding a language:

 

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I am following this with interest, I wonder if this will affect the protection of the queen and the ability of the cluster to move in the middle of winter.
 

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Ursa, I do not think the queen is sequestered for winter.
IMO that would not work.

In Summer or early fall the sequester would do a brood break, which we think disrupts the mite breeding cycle.
Hopefully the OP can offer insight.

GG
 

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Ursa, I do not think the queen is sequestered for winter.
IMO that would not work.
GG, this is exactly the point - the queen being separated from the combs for the winter months.
Main reason - elimination of undesired brooding too late/too early.
Another reason - wintering more than one queen in same colony.
It does work for those who mastered it.
But it is too much work IMO.
 

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GG, this is exactly the point - the queen being separated from the combs for the winter months.
Main reason - elimination of undesired brooding too late/too early.
Another reason - wintering more than one queen in same colony.
It does work for those who mastered it.
But it is too much work IMO
be tough
ok then wow

in My hives the queen may move up a box or 2 in winter, so not sure on that.
for the 1 deep winter effort I can see it.
Also my queens start brood in late feb, one place still has 2 feet of snow then, Snow mobile in and let the queen out seems an odd behavior to initiate.

IMO this is local dependent.

if some one try this pls post the trials and tribulations.

GG
 

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ok then wow

in My hives the queen may move up a box or 2 in winter, so not sure on that.
for the 1 deep winter effort I can see it.
Also my queens start brood in late feb, one place still has 2 feet of snow then, Snow mobile in and let the queen out seems an odd behavior to initiate.

IMO this is local dependent.

if some one try this pls post the trials and tribulations.

GG
So here is a Youtube channel:
  • this guy winters on 2 boxes - technically 1.5 boxes (though people also do it on single Dadant deeps - deep enough frames)
    • look at his winter config on some of his winter videos
  • his hive is roughly square 300x300 box (it is on Great Polish (Велико-пол'ский) frame - somewhat deeper than the Lang deep)
  • he routinely winters 2 (even 3) queens per a colony in the multi-box setup; a single queen is a norm.
  • he runs some sort of local mutt bee variety he has been selecting for decades (he is close to Ukraine/Russia border - roughly UZDA zone 5 - it is regular Michigan winter); basically, he does not want bees brooding too early/too later - this is also a part of mite control regiment
This guy's typical winter configs are easy to see here:

It can be done and it is being done by those who need it - as we speak.
However, this guys is at it 100% of his time.
He has been doing nothing else but bees for the last 30-40(?) years as well as writing books about his methods.

The main channel:
 
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