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When extracting with a motorized extractor, what rpm is "recommended" to start with and what is the highest recommended rpm? Assuming a radial extractor....

Chris
 

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Local feral survivors in eight frame medium boxes.
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Yours has a tachometer? Wow!

I have no idea what the rpms are, but start slow and don't speed up until a significant amount of honey is out of the frames. The fast speeds are for when the comb is mostly empty.

Once you blow one out, you'll know what too fast is. After you peel yourself off the ceiling.
 

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I have the same extractor as Michael Mannlake 9/18 and slow at the beginning is good.I use a good lite to look down the side of the extractor.I start slow till i see less honey come out of the frames then just keep speeding it up from there till they are empty and the extractor is wide open.Like said you will know when you went to many rpm to fast.It will start following you across the room or jump like giant jummping bean.
 

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I assume that being chased around the room by your extractor is not fun.... :D

I am just about finished building an extractor based on Dave Verville's plans and was trying to size a motor to it. I emailed him as well as posting here. He is using 1/12 HP motor + ZeroMax drive with a top output rpm of approx. 400. The ZeroMax gives infinitely variable output from 0 to 400 rpm.

Thanks for the advice. I will start out nice and slow...

Chris
 

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I think i read somplace that top rpm on my extractor is 320 rmp and this it more than enough.I am not sure what the ZeroMax drive is.All mine has is a simple Varyable speed control for a router.
 

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The main reason for starting "slow" is that
not all combs in the extractor are created equal.

The initial spins are to remove the "extra" honey
so that one has a somewhat "balanced" load of
frames before going up to higher speeds.

Assuming that you are using a tangential
extractor, a higher extractor speed
(higher tangential velocity) is going
to create a spike in centripetal acceleration
for the combs that contain the most honey.

You remember good old Newton, and his
"Force = Mass * Acceleration" equation,
so the problem faced when extracting honey
is that we want to avoid applying too much
acceleration until all the combs contain
roughly equal mass.

Even with a hand-cranked extractor, you can
see (and FEEL) this. The extractor acts like
a bucking horse for a while.

This is why one can find "automated" speed
controls, which slowly increase the rotational
speed as time passes. (I've never seen one
that only speeds up the motor when it detects
a non-vibrating shaft, which would be better.)
 
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