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I have a DC motor driven 20 frame extractor with variable speed. I changed made a few mounting changes over the winter to improve handling of the extractor and reduce the issue on the extractor dancing across the floor. My first step was to mount the extractor on wheels, a caster with three wheels per caster, to allow oscillations caused by the off-center CG (weird approach?). I then put the a piece of semi-soft rubber, a thick rubber door mat cut up into pieces, under the casters in hopes of dampening the "Dance" and keep it in one place.

First time up-to-bat, full load of honey frames resulted in a slow startup and large oscillation. Observing the circle formed by the draining honey resulted in a 1 1/2 inch circle. As time went on it got worse but stayed in place! Enlightenment struck me - guessed I missed some de-capping of frames. Inspection showed I was correct - two sides in fact. Resumed spinning and the oscillation circle in the honey got smaller and smaller, increased RPM, weight was going down, circle got smaller. I like extra spins 15 minute spins ( auto shut -off timer) to get the frames really dry before cleaning and freezing for reuse. For the first time I was able to reach maximum RPM and walk away. The honey imprinted circle was 1/2 inch in diameter - from a dribble coming out. Now the question becomes will I wear a rubber pad out. Next run I will measure the temperature of the rubber pad.

Freeing the extractor to allow oscillations, I believe, reduces the load on the cage bearing or wear and tear. The rubber pad restricts extractor motion relative to the room - no dancing. Freedom to leave the the area while extracting was achieved.

Net result - I like it. Frames were really clean and dry, extractor stayed in one place, reached maximum RPM, identified a beekeeper's error test method and got 80 lb. or more of my favorite, golden Spring honey. Plus the extractor is on wheels and I can easily move it and clean up.

Now for more trial runs :)
 

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hmmm, pondering here, and I have not tried this, but I wonder if putting the casters in "bowls" would work well. It might absorb some of the energy from being off balance, while still keeping the extractor from walking to far.

I dont know the technical name for this system/concept, but I think I have seen it before. I can not find anything searching so here is a crude paint picture. Black is the bowl, red is the wheel and green is the extractor leg.

dampener 26 jun 2020.jpg

I borrow an extractor once a year, so I can not easily test this.
 

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I find that once the majority of the honey is out, I can max out the extractor with relative stability to really dry them out.
 
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