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I have a Maxant 3100 power extractor that I've just used for the first time. Looking for tips on how to clean it up. Any suggestions would be appreciated.
 

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How about a small pressure washer?
 

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I use a hose, adjustable nozzle, real hot water.
 

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You could let the bees clean it out. There is a youtube video of a guy letting his bees clean his extractor. He mentioned after a day it was pretty much cleaned of the bulk of honey and then much easier for him to do a final clean. He put it a ways from his hive to prevent robbing. Seems like a good idea? I'm sure this is an old trick.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9XfPTCafVIE
 

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Very hot water! my honey house has a spray hose like in a restraunt kitchen. then I dry and polish my extractor and use food grad lube on moving parts.
 

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Well, you bought a quality extractor, so it deserves more than a cursory rinse.
If you remove the couple of bolts that hold the cage assembly, you can pull the whole assembley out. You can then clean the cage with soap and water and then rinse. The interior of the drum is now so that you can also clean it properly.
When you reassemble the cage into the drum put a little bit of food grade grease into the cup in the middle of the drum and a little on the bottom of the cage . Then reassemble. Since you bought a superb product , it deserves proper care.
It will most likely last you couple hundred years with care. :D:thumbsup:
 

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i use a combination of both my bees does the first clean then i go in after with hot water and soap.
I just got a extractor and that's what I'm going to try. Let the bees get the majority, which they'll probably be happy to do, then the cleaning should go much easier. I know in the past they've cleaned other tools and frames that I have gotten a sticky honey mess on.
 

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By letting the ladies clean up you are able to get all kinds of AFB, EFB and nosema spores to all your hives.
Maybe you should re think your procedure. Same goes for other tools too. Soap and hot water is sooo cheap.
Why chance it.:no:
 

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Klaus, good point about foulbrood/Nosema. Yes letting the bees clean will certainly mean your bees mixing with bees from other hives in the extractor. Rather I should say, let the bees remove the majority of honey and then do your final cleaning with soap/water to sanitize for next time and remove any FB/Nos spores.

In the past we have shared extractors at extraction get together's and not thought much of it. FB and Nosema are issues that I worry about more these days. That said, the spores that cause these diseases are ever present in the air and possibly on the bees that your bees meet when foraging. Always sterilize shared equipment but what's more important is to keep your hives clean, strong & healthy so they can continually fight off these diseases before they can get a foothold.
 

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By letting the ladies clean up you are able to get all kinds of AFB, EFB and nosema spores to all your hives.
Maybe you should re think your procedure. Same goes for other tools too. Soap and hot water is sooo cheap.
Why chance it.:no:
not a big fan of soap on my food production equipment.
i do home-brewing and i use what is called (five-star inc.) powdered brewers wash (PBW). it works great and in many temperature ranges (40° to 160°). very little scrubbing on scorched, caked on gunk.

i also like five-star's starsan for a sanitizer, odorless, tasteless, colorless, and food grade. put it in a spray bottle and spritz and the stuff lasts forever.

a lot of the beek stores sell these products, i noticed more carry "b-brite", not the same thing, but a similar product that has a lower working temperature. I personally think PBW (or straight-a) is better/stronger.

both are safe for hard and soft metals

here is a quote from some sales literature.

http://www.northernbrewer.com/brewi...anitation-cleaning/powdered-brewery-wash.html

PBW (Powdered Brewery Wash) is a patented alkali cleaner originally developed for Coors, now widely used in commercial breweries across North America. Use 1 to 2 ounces per gallon for cleaning kettles, 3/4 ounce per gallon for fermenters, kegs, tanks, and other equipment. Soak equipment overnight in PBW solution; rinse the following morning - no scrubbing required! Will not damage rubber gaskets, soft metals, or your skin. PBW can effectively clean items that can't be reached with a brush or sponge, and is strong enough to remove thick, difficult, caked-on organic soils. PBW is environmentally friendly, biodegradable, and will not harm septic systems.

http://www.northernbrewer.com/brewi...s-equipment/sanitation-cleaning/star-san.html

A food-grade acid anionic rinse for removing microbes from brewing and winemaking equipment. Star San is self-foaming, which helps it to penetrate cracks and crevices; foaming can be minimized by adding Star San to a vessel after the water has been added, and by siphoning rather than pouring or pumping the solution. It is flavorless, odorless, and does not require rinsing when used at the recommended dilution.

Use 1 oz Star San per 5 gallons of water; allow 1 to 2 minutes of contact, then drain thoroughly, no rinsing required. Used as a soaking solution, it can also be applied by hand (wear gloves) or with a spray bottle. It is safe for use on all surfaces, but use caution since it is an acid; contact with soft metals, rubber, and plastic should be kept to a minimum.

A solution of Star San will remain effective for up to three to four weeks in a sealed container; it is effective as long as the pH is 3 or lower. Star San is environmentally friendly, biodegradable, and will not harm septic systems.
 

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plaztikjezuz, thanks for that info. I will check out those products when its time to clean my extractor. I'm still probably going to let the girls do the pre-cleaning.
 

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By letting the ladies clean up you are able to get all kinds of AFB, EFB and nosema spores to all your hives.
Maybe you should re think your procedure. Same goes for other tools too. Soap and hot water is sooo cheap.
Why chance it.:no:
So I guess you never move a frame to another hive and all your supers are marked to a particular hive? I think this is way overstated.
 

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Klaus points out some very good facts. In fact he is 100% correct. I would let my bees clean up my extractor. But when I extract it is on a day when other beeks come over to do their honey. hence I don't swap frames or equitment with them I don't always know the health of their hives might be. So Klaus is correct.
 

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thanks Ross you beat me to the same question, my sentiments also. We let the bees clean our extractors then we follow up with a good scrubbing.
 
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