Beesource Beekeeping Forums banner

1 - 3 of 3 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
29 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hello all!

I've been a beekeeper in Paris, France for four years now and head beekeeper at the company for two years. We run 650 (mostly urban) beehives and space is becoming an issue in our storage / extraction room.

At the moment we've got a converted two car garage with a sink in one corner, plus a workshop that just seems to be filled with a rotation of feeders, queen excluders, supers, new frames, old frames, nuc boxes and just general beekeeping junk that seems to appear from nowhere... All of our extraction gear is small and mobile as we keep the honey from each of our sites separate. But as hive numbers grow, we're finding it more and more tedious to play beekeeper tetris every month as we almost literally have to rearrange the entire space to make things work.

We're hoping to move to a new location over winter so I'm trying to plan out a new working space and get ideas now. I'm seeing bigger is better.

So I'm looking for any tips you guys might have. If you had to start over, what would you do differently for your extraction set up?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,086 Posts
Just for ideas:

I am "backyard" and evolving. I separate extraction from general beekeeping task and hardware with a wall. I installed an extractor, freezer and dehumidifier in the extraction room and may add a warm honey storage box. It is small, 12'x10' (~4mx3m) but works for me as I manually de-cap. The freezer and humidifier help keep the room warm along with an electric heater when needed. I also store all sensitive beekeeping equipment and literature in the room. I have a sink just outside the door for cleaning and can add a hose when necessary (cleaning extractor). I am adding a bottling and honey creaming station to the extraction room. Full honey frames come-in in plastic boxes. I prefer to select and harvest frames with a bee brush.

I treat honey frames post extra-spinning to get them honey dry, freeze them for 48 hours, than wash them with warm water for winter storage. I store in plastic containers to which I added seals - moth and mice issues here. Everything else, including stored frames goes in the barn.

I think this is easily scalable but I know very little about automated de-capping. I am sure you will try to be less labor intensive - I am retired :)
 
1 - 3 of 3 Posts
Top